The 2019 Moving Together Conference

Date: 10/24/2019 7:45 AM - 10/24/2019 4:00 PM

Location: Boston Park Plaza Hotel
50 Park Plaza

Boston, Massachusetts

Capacity:

476/800


Overview

REGISTER TODAY!



2019 Moving Together Conference

• Attend workshops and panels that highlight current pedestrian, bicyclist and public transportation topics

• Network with colleagues representing diverse interests from the public, academic and private sectors

• All new site visits and mobile workshops led by engineers and bicyclist/pedestrian advocates.

Thursday, October 24, 2019 • 7:45 AM – 4:00 PM

Boston Park Plaza Hotel, 50 Park Plaza at Arlington Street, Boston, MA.

Opening Speaker

Jonathan Gulliver

Jonathan Gulliver
Highway Administrator, Massachusetts
Department of Transportation

Luncheon Keynote Speaker

Secretary Pollack 

Stephanie Pollack
Secretary and CEO, Massachusetts Department of Transportation


Mobile App Image 

See Session Descriptions on the Moving Together Mobile App!

The Moving Together App features: 

• Personalized scheduling and reminders
• Networking opportunities with other attendees
• Real-time conference updates
• Conference, sponsor, and exhibitor details
• Messaging, tweets, and Facebook posts
• Photo sharing

Click Here to Download the App

The History of the Moving Together Conference

In 1998, both the statewide bicycling action plan and the statewide pedestrian action plan, called for the establishment of an annual statewide conference for educational and networking purposes. The first two of these conferences were held in Worcester, MA in 2000. In May, at Clark University, 50 people gathered to discuss only walking issues. Later in the year, at the Worcester Holiday Inn, 50 people focused only on bicycling issues.

In 2005, the conference moved to Boston. The first several years, the conference was held at the Marriott Courtyard on Tremont Street. Interest continued to grow until attendance hit approximately 250 persons and the conference moved to a larger venue at the Back Bay Sheraton.

The conference continued to grow and in 2013 the conference was held for the first time at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. Transit joined the conference as a featured mode. In 2014, more workshops than ever were offered along with the addition of site visits. Over 650 people attended the event. In 2016, the conference sold out for the second year straight! Each year the conference continues to bring together transportation leaders and individuals involved in the areas of planning, public health, bicyclist and pedestrian safety, transit, advocacy, elected office, law enforcement and education.

Safe Streets Smart Trips Logo

Announcing the 2019 Smart Trips High School Video Contest

MassDOT is announcing the sixth annual statewide high school video contest, Safe Streets Smart Trips. The contest serves as an initiative within the Massachusetts Strategic Highway Safety Plan to promote and educate the public about safe walking, bicycling, and driving behaviors. The contest began five years ago to encourage high school students to showcase their understanding of roadway safety across all travel modes to try to decrease pedestrian and bicyclist injuries and fatalities.

Complete contest guidelines are being sent to high schools and are also found at the Roadway Safety Video website.

Learn more about the Safe Streets Smart Trips high school video contest or call 857-383-3807.

 

MassDOT Logo      FHWA Logo   

This event is accessible to people with disabilities and individuals with limited English proficiency. If you need a reasonable accommodation (such as American Sign Language Interpreters, assistive listening devices, handouts in alternate formats, etc.) and/or language assistance (such as translated documents or an interpreter) to fully participate, please contact Cindy Schaedig at 413-577-2762 or cschaedig@ecs.umass.edu at least 14 days prior to the event.  Such services are provided free of charge.

 

Email Kathryn Donnelly at Donnelly@umass.edu to become a sponsor or exhibitor for the 2019 Moving Together Conference! 


gold starGold Level Sponsorsgold star

Please click on our sponsor's logo to visit their website

VHB logo    Jacobs Engineering    Stantec Logo   AECOM logo    Michael Baker International Logo     HDR Logo       HNTB Logo   WSP Logo

 

 

silver star Silver Level Sponsorssilver star

Please click on our sponsor's logo to visit their website

BL Companies Logo   City Point Partners Logo   Brennan Consulting Logo  Green International Affiliates Logo    Kleinfelder Logo  Howard Stein Hudson Logo  world tech engineering logo    Weston and Sampson Logo  Greenman Pedersen Logo   Nitsch Engineering  BSC Group Logo  McMahon Associates Logo  Beals and Thomas Logo

 

bronze starBronze Level Sponsorsbronze star

Please click on our sponsor's logo to visit their website

Big R Bridge Logo    Tetra Tech Logo  Fuss and O'Neill Logo  Bryant Associates Logo  CHA Engineering


Exhibitors 

Pexco Logo Beta Logo  Pavers by Ideal Logo  Ocean State Signal LogoTransportation for MA logo  WalkBoston Logo  Pare Corporation Logo  Executive Office of Elder Affairs  MassMobility Logo ITDP Logo  CTPS Logo  FHWA Logo  Cambridge Systematics  MBTA Logo

 

 

 
Registration
Amount

$100.00
Register by 10/24/2019
Private Sector

Register

$100.00
Register by 10/24/2019
Public Sector

Register

MassDOT
Register by 10/24/2019
MassDOT

Register

$45.00
Register by 10/24/2019
Student Fee-Please call 413-545-2604 to receive discount

Register

If you are having trouble with registration, please call 413-545-2604 for assistance.

Sponsor Fees
Amount

$3,000.00
Register by 10/24/2019
Gold Level

Register

$1,500.00
Register by 10/24/2019
Silver Level

Register

$750.00
Register by 10/24/2019
Bronze Level

Register

$500.00
Register by 10/24/2019
Exhibitor

Register

$0 (Regular Attendee Fees Apply)
Register by 10/24/2019
Public Sector Non-Profit/Government

Register
Sponsors

What Moving Together Can Do For Your Company or Organization

When you exhibit at Moving Together, your company or organization will be visited by over 800 professionals involved in healthy transportation, planning, design, construction, public health, bike and pedestrian safety, transit, advocacy, elected offices, law enforcement and education. Take advantage of the opportunity to meet with the key decision makers involved in pedestrian, bicycle and public transportation. In addition, there are several opportunities to promote your company or organization through special sponsorship opportunities being offered throughout the day.

 

Additional benefits for sponsors and exhibitors include:

• Logo recognition on conference sponsor/exhibitor website page.

• Name and logo listed in conference slide show played throughout the day in the main ballroom.

 

Online Sponsor/Exhibitor Registration Is Now Available!

Please click on the "Sponsor Fees" tab at the top of the page. 

 

Photos of the audience and exhibitor

Special Sponsorship Opportunities

Gold Level Sponsorship

A GOLD Level Sponsor includes booth space, skirted table and chair as well as the following:

Your company logo on:

• Event website home page under Gold Level Sponsor (including link to sponsor’s website).

• Email and direct mail marketing materials.

• Logo in conference mobile app.

• The conference slide show played throughout the day in the main ballroom.

• A "thank you" banner featuring your company logo displayed in the main ballroom.

• Company listing on session agenda signs outside each room.

• Two complimentary attendee registrations.

$3,000.00

 

Silver Level Sponsorship

A SILVER Level Sponsor includes booth space, skirted table and chair as well as the following:

Your company logo on:

• Event website home page under Silver Level Sponsor (including link to sponsor’s website).

• Logo in conference mobile app.

• Email and direct mail marketing materials.

• The conference slide show played throughout the day in the main ballroom.

• One complimentary attendee registration.

$1,500.00

 

Bronze Level Sponsorship

A BRONZE Level Sponsor includes booth space, skirted table and chair as well as the following:

Your company logo on:

• Event website home page under Bronze Level Sponsor (including link to sponsor’s website).

• Logo in conference mobile app.

• The conference slide show played throughout the day in the main ballroom.

• One complimentary attendee registration.

$750.00

 

Exhibitor

Your Exhibitor Booth Includes:

• A 6-foot skirted table, one chair and one waste paper basket.

• Additional chairs are available on request, depending on the number of attendees registered by your organization.

• One complimentary attendee registration.

$500.00

EXHIBITOR PACKAGE

Online Sponsor/Exhibitor Registration Now Available!

Please click on the "Sponsor Fees" tab at the top of the page.

Registration forms can be faxed (413-545-9569) or emailed to donnelly@umass.edu. We welcome walking, bicycle-friendly and transit-friendly vendors, businesses, professional planning/design/engineering services, educational and non-profit advocacy groups.

Questions can be directed to Kathryn Donnelly 413-230-6791.

sponsor map
To view larger map, right click on image and choose "open image in new window"

Map for illustration purposes only. Booth location is approximate. Exhibitor booths will be located in Plaza Ballroom and on Mezzanine. **Booth choice is based on sponsorship level and order of registration payments received.

 

BRONZE LEVEL SPONSORSHIP

Agenda

2019 Moving Together Conference Agenda

Thursday, October 24, 2019
Park Plaza Hotel, Boston

PROGRAM TRACKS:  PI (PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION) PD (PLACEMAKING DESIGN) M (MUNICIPAL)

REGISTRATION/EXHIBITS: 7:45 am - 8:45 am

WELCOME SESSION: 8:45 am - 9:15 am
Jonathan Gulliver, Highway Administrator, Massachusetts Department of Transportation

BREAK/EXHIBITS: 9:15 am - 9:30 am

CONCURRENT SESSION #1: 9:30 am - 10:45 am
Session 1A – A Look into the Past and Future of Complete Streets M
Session 1B – MassDOT Data Overview – What We’re Using 
Session 1C – Quick Builds and Pilots to Advance Multimodal Mobility PI
Session 1D – MassTrails Investments in Trails Across the Commonwealth
Session 1E – Latest Design Guidance PD

BREAK/EXHIBITS: 10:45 am - 11:00 am

CONCURRENT SESSION #2: 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Session 2A – Improving Biking and Walking - Project Spotlight PI
Session 2B – Increasing Mobility through Technology
Session 2C – Measuring Equity at a Statewide Level 
Session 2D – New Approaches to Crossing Treatments PD
Session 2E – Central MA Regional Connectivity M

LUNCHEON/KEYNOTE ADDRESS/VIDEO AWARDS: 12:15 pm - 1:15 pm
Stephanie Pollack, Secretary and CEO, Massachusetts Department of Transportation

CONCURRENT SESSION #3: 1:15 pm - 2:30 pm
SITE VISIT: Walking tour of New Separated Bike Lanes on Charles River Dam Road
Meet at the Registration Table

Tour is limited to the first 25 attendees to sign up at the registration table the morning of the conference. MassDOT’s recently completed reconstruction to this major arterial (Route 28) includes separated bike lanes between Land Boulevard and Leverett Circle, while maintaining  two travel lanes in each direction, and a dedicated turn lane onto Land Boulevard. This work is the result of close collaboration with the local community, advocates, elected officials, and key stakeholders to update and refine these long-planned roadway changes so that they increase safety for this important corridor.

SITE VISIT: South Bay Harbor Trail construction
Meet in the Hotel Lobby

Tour is limited to the first 25 attendees to sign up at the registration table the morning of the conference. A number of transportation and development projects in this area will make the South Bay Harbor Trail a vital non-motorized corridor for the growing downtown population. The trail will also complement MassDOT’s popular Infra-space Project under I-93 which provides better bike/ped connections between South Boston and the South End. 

Session 3B – Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Suburban and Rural Mobility M
Session 3C – Placemaking – A Firsthand Look at Ongoing Projects PD
Session 3D – Emerging Popular Mobility
Session 3E – Improving South Shore Transportation

BREAK/EXHIBITS: 2:30 pm - 2:45 pm

SESSION #4: 2:45 pm - 4:00 pm

TBD

THE YOUNG PROFESSIONALS IN TRANSPORTATION (YPT) SOCIAL HOUR: 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

M.J. O’Connor’s

 

 

SESSION ROOMS

mezzanine map

avenue 34 floor plan

News

Baker-Polito Administration Announces Complete Streets Funding Program Awards

Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito today joined Transportation Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack, Highway Administrator Jonathan Gulliver, and local officials in Springfield to announce funding awards totaling $5.1 million to eighteen communities through the Complete Streets Funding Program to support local, multimodal infrastructure projects that improve accessibility for people walking, biking, taking transit, and using other forms of transportation. The Baker-Polito Administration has now awarded a total of approximately $38 million in construction funding since creating a funding program for Complete Streets in February 2016.

The event in Springfield also highlighted $365,022 previously awarded to the City of Springfield through the Complete Streets Funding Program in February 2018. This award funded multimodal infrastructure improvements at several locations such as adding bicycle improvements at numerous locations and carrying out work such as repainting crosswalks, installing warning strips at key intersections, repairing sidewalks, installing buffered bicycle lanes, and putting in place bicycle signage and shared use markings. The additional $207,161 in funding being announced for Springfield today will build upon these past investments and improvements.

“This popular program empowers local communities to improve their transportation infrastructure to support different modes of getting people where they need to go, whether they are walking, bicycling, using public transit or driving,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “We are pleased to have included support for the Complete Streets program in our administration’s recently filed transportation bond bill so that the Commonwealth can continue to invest in improving mobility, access, and safety for all roadway users across the Commonwealth.”

“Our administration has prioritized serving as a reliable partner for cities and towns and the Complete Streets program is one of the key ways in which we can help communities achieve their local transportation priorities,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “We look forward to seeing the completion of these multimodal projects and for residents and visitors to enjoy the benefits that they each will bring.”
A “Complete Street” is one that provides safe and accessible options for all travel modes and for all people, taking into account the ages and abilities of individuals. To date, 201 municipalities have approved Complete Streets policies and 161 have approved prioritization plans.

Governor Baker recently filed a transportation bond bill seeking $18 billion in additional capital authorization to invest in building and modernizing a transportation system that meets the needs of residents, businesses and cities and towns statewide. The authorization would be used to fund existing programs as well as several new initiatives designed to lessen impacts from roadway congestion and ensure reliable travel throughout the Commonwealth. This bill also includes an additional $20 million for the Complete Streets Funding Program to assist cities and towns throughout the Commonwealth.

“Thanks to the leadership of Governor Baker and Lieutenant Governor Polito, MassDOT continues to work closely with municipal partners to increase safety, accessibility, and connectivity throughout the Commonwealth,” said Transportation Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack. “Complete Streets design concepts are important because they support people using all modes of transportation and help ensure that travelers safely and efficiently reach the places they need to go.”
“These eighteen communities are receiving funding to build sidewalks, install bicycle lanes, improve traffic signals, and put in place infrastructure that accommodates all modes of travel,” said Highway Administrator Jonathan Gulliver. “We thank the MassDOT staff members who work diligently to manage this program and congratulate each of the award winners.”

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno added, “First of all, I am very thankful to Governor Baker, Lt. Governor Polito and Mass DOT Secretary Pollack for their efforts in assisting Springfield to obtain this grant.  I’m proud that my administration has adopted a ‘Complete Streets’ policy, which will enable safe access for all users regardless of age or ability.  These monies will help DPW Director Chris Cignoli to incorporate ‘Complete Street’ components in these specifically named projects. Also, we are attempting to incorporate ‘Complete Streets’ components into arterial streets as part of our paving program where conditions warrant, if funds are available, which my administration will continue to identify and pursue.”

The Complete Streets Funding Program was launched by the Baker-Polito Administration on February 1, 2016. Examples of projects that can be addressed through the program include filling bicycle and pedestrian network gaps, improving transit access, installing street lighting, improving safety of crosswalks and intersections, and building new shared use paths.

Today’s announcement regarding the Complete Streets Program provides funding to the following communities:

Abington is receiving $399,996 to construct a shared use path along Lincoln Boulevard and put in place traffic calming measures. The Town also plans on utilizing available roadway width along Washington Street from Elm to Adams Street, and along Adams Street from Washington Street to Route 139, to provide exclusive bicycle lanes to extend the connection in a north-south direction. This will extend bicycle connectivity to commercial areas, residential neighborhoods, popular recreational areas, and other points of interest schools, the library, town hall, Island Grove Pond and Park, Abington Park & Recreation, restaurants, shops and the post office.

Ayer is receiving $203,118 to construct a new sidewalk along School Street from Prospect to Bligh Street creating a new connection to the town park, library, courthouse, youth athletic fields, business district, and Pond Street Senior Center. Funding also includes replacing sidewalks and curb ramps from East Main to Prospect Street. Ayer has leveraged other funding sources to provide complete streets accommodations surrounding this project including the recently completed path at the Pirone Park and constructing new sidewalks on Pleasant Street and Oak Street to improve access and pedestrian safety.

Buckland is receiving $133,797 to make pedestrian network improvements in Shelburne Falls Village. This includes work on State Street such as extending the 5-foot wide sidewalk from the town parking area to the nearby crosswalk accessing State Street, removing sidewalk obstructions, installing new curb ramps, repositioning the stop sign at William Street and refreshing crosswalk paint to improve visibility. A second project along Ashfield Street connects the commercial center of Shelburne Falls to dense residential neighborhoods, installing a new crosswalk, and widening part of the existing sidewalk to 5-feet wide. Overall, these improvements will improve pedestrian access to the main commercial street and serve environmental justice neighborhoods.

Chelsea is receiving $361,364 to make safety improvements in the area of the Carter Street/Everett Avenue intersection which is located adjacent to Chelsea High School. The project includes installation of new pedestrian signal equipment, including pedestrian push buttons and countdown signal heads, bicycle route signs and bicycle detection, sidewalk extensions, striping a new crosswalk across the Everett Avenue, and restriping pavement markings. In addition, new 5-foot wide bicycle lanes will be striped along both directions of Everett Avenue between the city line and the rail line crossing, and along both directions of Carter Street between Everett Avenue and Blossom Street.

Cohasset is receiving $254,755 to reconstruct the sidewalk around and across the town common, install seven crosswalks, and improve curbing on the north side of Highland Avenue and Robert Jason Road. This will help facilitate pedestrian access in the area of the town hall, Cohasset Senior Center, South Shore Community Center, Cohasset Housing Authority, Pratt Memorial Library, residential homes, businesses, and the waterfront.

Dedham is receiving $399,933 to improve pedestrian and bicycle access and safety between Barnes Memorial Park, Dedham Middle School, Avery Elementary School, Dedham High School, the town center, the MBTA commuter rail station, and surrounding residential neighborhoods. Bicycle lanes will extend north-south on East Street and east-west on Eastern and Whiting Avenue. Additionally, new sidewalk will be constructed along Eastern Avenue, two new pedestrian signals will be installed, and pedestrian improvements will be made on East Street.

Ipswich is receiving $135,000 to make improvements to Little Neck Road and Lord Intersection. This includes the construction of a sidewalk along the north side of Little Neck/Bayview Road from Pirate Park playground to the existing crosswalk, and along the south side of Bayview Road to the far side of the Pavilion Beach parking lot. The project will improve the safety for both pedestrians and vehicles visiting the Pavilion Beach by creating a physical separation between the parking lot and Bayview Road, providing clear areas for pedestrians to cross, striping of new crosswalks, crossing signage, and yield pavement markings. Bicycle racks will be installed at the beach parking lot to provide bicycle accommodations. A second project includes tightening the corner radius, construction of a pedestrian curb extension, and crosswalk striping at the High Street/Short Street (Lord Square) intersection, reconstruction of sidewalks and installation of pedestrian warning signage along High Street.

Lincoln is receiving $132,424 to make connectivity improvements including a sidewalk that links a pedestrian/bicycle pocket park and travels along Lincoln Road to the Codman Road/Lincoln Road intersection, and to Codman Farm in the village center. The project also includes a sidewalk that will wind through conservation land and Lincoln’s community gardens linking the village center and Codman Farm. The town will further enhance the sidewalk with benches and interactive nature play stations to encourage walking and biking in the village center. The intersection at Lincoln/Codman Road will be improved with crosswalks to facilitate safe pedestrian crossing and improve connectivity to other amenities within walking distance from the MBTA station and the village center, such as Drumlin Farm.

Lynnfield is receiving $383,555 to improve pedestrian access and safety at three schools: Lynnfield Middle School, Summer Street School, and Huckleberry Hill Elementary School. The proposed improvements will include tightening intersections, modifying and painting crosswalks, installing pedestrian signals, providing crossing islands, improving signage and pavement markings, and placing radar speed feedback signs. This will help provide more visible, safer pedestrian crossings and control driver behavior and speeds.

Millbury is receiving $174,499 to reconstruct the South Main Street intersection with North Main and Elm Street. South Main Street is a pedestrian access route that links the dense residential neighborhood beyond the South Main Street Bridge, which includes 83 units of low-income senior and family housing, to Millbury Center’s shops, restaurants, banks, services, churches, day care center, and municipal facilities. South Main Street also links the residential neighborhood to schools within and just beyond Millbury Center and is an important destination for bicyclists utilizing the nearby Blackstone River Bikeway. This project will reconstruct the intersection, replace sidewalks, reduce crossing distance, create a new pedestrian plaza, install curb extensions, new LED street lights, bicycle racks next to the bus shelter, and bicycle wayfinding signs. The project will also improve transit connections for pedestrians and bicyclists.

Nantucket is receiving $114,114 to create a quality walking and biking connection along Sparks Avenue from Atlantic Avenue to Hooper Farm Road. The project will construct an 8-foot wide sidewalk that will connect to existing sidewalks on Atlantic Avenue and create a complete sidewalk network. Additionally, crosswalks will be realigned, shortened and restriped for safety and better visibility. This new sidewalk will connect pedestrians and bicyclists with points west, Mill Hill Park, the Nantucket Cottage Hospital, Nantucket High School and athletic fields, the Lower Pleasant Business District, surrounding neighborhoods, and points east. The project is within a mile of the Nantucket High School/Special Education, the Nantucket Elementary School, the Montessori Children’s House of Nantucket, and the Nantucket Lighthouse School.

Pittsfield is receiving $353,562 to make numerous pedestrians and bicycle accessibility improvements. This includes sidewalk upgrades along Allen Street from East to School Street, improvements at the intersection of Fenn and Allen Street to provide greater separation for pedestrians, and the installation of a separated bicycle lane along Wahconah Street along a corridor between Wahconah Park and Berkshire Medical Center, housing, and businesses. Other projects include new mid-block crosswalks, intersection upgrades along Burbank Street adjacent to Morningside Community School, safety upgrades at the intersection of East and Elm Street, improvements at the intersection of West and Hurlbut Street, new bicycle lanes and signage along Elm Street, safety improvements at the intersection of Springside Avenue and Grove Street, and sidewalk repairs along Union Street.

Rockland is receiving $399,228 to realign the intersection of East Water and Liberty Street which is located within one mile of the Rockland Junior and Senior High School, the McKinley School, the Holy Family School, the Rockland Community Education Center, the Memorial Park Elementary School, and the Jefferson Elementary School. The work will create a four-way stop controlled intersection by removing the slip-lanes, installing curb extensions to reduce corner radii, re-aligning and restriping crosswalks to reduce crossing distances for pedestrians, and installing new signage.

Shirley is receiving $392,091 to improve bicycle and pedestrian facilities along Front Street and allow connections to the MBTA Commuter Rail, town hall, Ayer/Shirley Regional Middle School, banks, convenience stores, Hazen Library, and the U.S. Post Office. The work will replace the Front Street sidewalk with 5-feet ADA compliant concrete sidewalks, wheelchair ramps, and warning panels from Main Street to Hospital Road. It will replace crosswalks with high visibility crosswalks and signage, and a new bicycle lane will be put in place on Front Street to improve bicycle safety and reduce vehicle speeds by narrowing the width of travel lanes.

Somerset is receiving $400,000 to make safety and pedestrian network improvements along Riverside Avenue, which travels in a north-south direction alongside the scenic Taunton River and connects to Pierce Playground, Pierce Beach, recreational and sports fields and to the Somerset Marina. The project will improve access and safety for pedestrians and bicyclists by narrowing travel lanes, constructing a continuous sidewalk on the river side, and installing raised crosswalks.

Springfield is receiving $207,161 to carry out six projects to help complete bicycle network links. This includes the installation of bicycle lanes along Roosevelt Avenue to enhance bicycling to Springfield College and local high schools, filling of a bicycle lane gap along South Branch Parkway to complete a network of bicycle friendly streets in residential neighborhoods, installation of  bicycle lanes and signage along Wilbraham Road adjacent to Western New England University campus, and installation of bicycle lanes and signage along East Street from Page Boulevard to the Chicopee city line. In addition, pedestrian safety improvements will be made at the intersection of Fisher/Haskin Street to improve access to Hiram L. Dorman Elementary School, and at three intersections along the walking route to the Lincoln Elementary School, Calhoun Park and Baystate Medical Center.

Topsfield is receiving $382,000 to make various safety and connectivity improvements throughout the Topsfield Common Historic District. The Town’s overall vision is to align safety and accessibility while also promoting multimodal access and connectivity throughout the adjacent residential neighborhood and the downtown village shopping area. This project replaces sidewalks and curb ramps on Grove and Washington Streets, closes gaps in the pedestrian network with new sidewalks, and enhances safety at Topsfield Rail Trail crossings.

West Bridgewater is receiving $287,399 to provide improved pedestrian connections and traffic control in the immediate vicinity of the West Bridgewater Middle-Senior High School, and improve access to the middle school, one of the elementary schools, and the library. To provide for safer crossings and improved control across West Center Street, a traffic control signal will be installed with accessible pedestrian controls, detectable warning surfaces and high visibility crosswalks to accommodate safe crossings. The proposed traffic control signal will include bicycle detection on all approaches to promote bicycle access along Howard Street.

Written by Klark Jessen, MassDOT Blog

 
 

Amtrak and MassDOT Announce Start of New Valley Flyer Train Service in Western and Northern Massachusetts

Amtrak, in conjunction with MassDOT, is launching a new state supported seven day a week passenger train on Friday, August 30, called the Valley Flyer.

The train will travel along the Connecticut River, a region referred to as the Knowledge Corridor, with trains making station stops in Springfield, Holyoke, Northampton and Greenfield. The trains will also connect with Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor at New Haven and serve stations between New Haven and Springfield. Tickets are now available and can be found on Amtrak.com, the Amtrak app, Amtrak ticket desks and kiosks, and through 1-800-USA-RAIL.

“The new Valley Flyer service highlights the continuing growing demand of train travel throughout this country,” said Amtrak President & CEO Richard Anderson. “We are proud to launch this service with our partners at MassDOT and offer Massachusetts residents and visitors with the ability to see all the state has to offer through rail travel.”

“Our administration continues to prioritize efforts to improve and expand transit opportunities in all corners of the Commonwealth, and the new Valley Flyer passenger rail pilot is an important step forward as we seek to meet the needs of residents and communities in Western Massachusetts,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “We look forward to this opportunity to partner with Amtrak and other stakeholders to bring this important new rail service to support communities from Springfield to Greenfield.”

“We are pleased to be collaborating with Amtrak on this two-year pilot passenger train service which will provide another transportation option along the Knowledge Corridor,” said Transportation Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack.  “We’ve appreciated the enthusiasm and support of municipal officials, members of the Massachusetts Legislature, the Massachusetts Congressional delegation, railroad companies and the business community in helping to launch the service and believe this new transportation option will be an economic boost to the region, a convenient travel option, and a step toward reaching our greenhouse gas reductions goals.”

“I am thrilled by the launch of the Valley Flyer passenger train service serving western and northern Massachusetts,” said Congressman Richard E. Neal. “I have been a champion of bringing increased passenger rail service to the residents of western Massachusetts and the addition of this line is yet another tremendous success. The introduction of this service, running through the recently re-opened and renovated Springfield Union Station, will help to grow the economy and tourism in the area and support a new field of workers who now have access to convenient employment hubs in the Pioneer Valley by simply travelling by rail. I am proud to be a partner in this great endeavor.”

“This pilot program could be a game-changer for our region, better connecting travelers and businesses while growing our economy,” said Massachusetts Congressman James McGovern.  “The Valley Flyer will finally make it possible for those in the Knowledge Corridor to commute to places like New York City and back in the same day while bringing more travelers into Massachusetts. I want to thank Amtrak and MassDOT for this investment in our community and will continue working to improve rail service so more people can see all our region has to offer.”

Valley Flyer customers can expect the same amenities onboard as they do on all other Amtrak trains including, free Wi-Fi, the freedom to use phones and electronic devices at all times (no “airplane mode”), the ability to travel with small pets on many trains, large spacious seats with ample leg room, no middle seat, and one of the most generous baggage policies in the travel industry, applicable for two personal items and two carry-on bags.

Trains 461, 471 and 495 will now originate in Greenfield traveling to Springfield and New Haven, and Trains 478, 488, and 494 will now originate in New Haven traveling to Springfield and Greenfield. Train 400 will originate in Springfield and terminate in Greenfield while train 499 will originate in Greenfield and terminate in Springfield. Trains 471, 478, 494, 495 will run Monday through Friday, and Trains 400, 461, 488 and 499 will run on weekends.

In preparation for the start of new service, Amtrak ran service readiness trains on the Knowledge Corridor throughout August, and Amtrak officials and the Amtrak Police Department (APD) hosted several presentations to various schools and positive enforcement grade crossing awareness events in the area, and shared rail safety messages to improve education on rail safety. Outreach efforts utilized material and rail safety information from Operation Lifesaver, a national non-profit organization dedicated to reducing railroad-related deaths and injuries.

The augmentation of train service to the Knowledge Corridor is a project of MassDOT. Amtrak also currently runs service along this rail corridor, with its Vermonter train, which connects St. Albans, Vermont to Washington, D.C.

Written By: Klark Jessen. Article from the MassDOT Blog



First New MBTA Orange Line Cars Enter Passenger Service

Governor Charlie Baker, MassDOT Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack, and MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak today introduced the first new Orange Line train comprised of six brand new cars into regular service from Wellington Station. These six new cars entering passenger service today are the first of 152 new Orange Line cars that will completely replace and expand the current Orange Line fleet (which is comprised of 120 cars), ensuring an additional 30,000 riders per day can be accommodated on the Orange Line once all cars have entered passenger service.

“Introducing the first of the new Orange Line cars into service is an important milestone in our administration’s work to deliver a modern, reliable, and safe transportation system for riders,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “Over the next several years, the MBTA will significantly increase daily capacity across the Red and Orange Lines, giving people more options for getting where they need to go.”

“The new cars will provide Orange Line customers with a more comfortable and accessible ride, improving customer experience,” said Lt. Governor Karyn Polito. “We are excited to see these cars start to go into service, and our administration will continue working with the MBTA to make signal and infrastructure upgrades to support the new vehicles.”

“The job of the transportation system is to move people,” said Transportation Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack. “When the entire Orange Line fleet is replaced, it will be able to carry more passengers per hour than ever before, there will be shorter times between trains, and customers will have more confidence that they can depend on public transportation system to get them where they need to go. In the words of the Governor’s Commission on the Future of Transportation, ‘Our duty is to build and nurture a reliable, sustainable, well-maintained, and financed multi-modal mobility system for the future’ and this new Orange Line train puts us on that path.”

“These new Orange Line cars are tangible signs of progress towards building a better MBTA.  They are just one of many projects that will improve service on the Orange Line,” said MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak. “With nearly $2 billion of investments in the Red and Orange Line improvement program – which includes replacing and expanding both fleets with new cars, replacing and upgrading the signal systems, upgrading track, and improving maintenance facilities – we’re very excited for these first Orange Line cars to enter service so our customers can experience a more modern, more comfortable, more accessible, and more reliable ride.”

As part of the MBTA’s $8 billion, 5-year capital investment plan, the Orange Line is being completely rebuilt. The Orange Line Improvement Program includes infrastructure improvements, signal upgrades, and the complete replacement of the Orange Line car fleet.

In 2014, the MBTA awarded CRRC MA Corporation a contract to design and manufacture 152 new Orange Line and 252 new Red Line subway cars (the FMCB approved the expanded procurement from 132 Red Line cars to 252 Red Line cars in December 2016), completely replacing and expanding both car fleets. Total value of the Red Line and Orange Line New Vehicle Procurement Program is about $1 billion.

The new Orange Line cars incorporate a variety of new features that improve reliability, maintainability, communications, safety, and comfort. They include more spacious interiors, LED lighting, automatic passenger counters, closed circuit cameras and video recording, and onboard diagnostics for operators and maintenance staff. The new vehicles also feature various accessibility improvements, including wider door openings, gap mitigation devices, additional passenger emergency intercoms, more handrails, four accessible access locations per car (two more than current cars), and modern audio and visual passenger information.

When all new cars are in service and infrastructure projects have been completed, Orange Line headways (time between trains) will be reduced from 6 minutes to 4.5 minutes with an increase in capacity by almost forty percent. The larger standardized fleet of entirely new cars will also allow the MBTA to implement a lifecycle maintenance program that will result in better maintained vehicles, fewer disabled trains and breakdowns that cause service disruptions, and an extended service life of at least thirty years.

Delivery of the new Orange Line cars is underway with all cars being assembled and tested at CRRC’s Rail Car Assembly Facility in Springfield, Massachusetts, before entering a testing phase at the Wellington Yard and Maintenance Facility. It is anticipated that the next brand new six-car Orange Line train will enter service in the fall 2019 with new cars continuing to enter passenger service incrementally through 2022.

Additional Work as Part of the Orange Line Improvement Program
Work includes new signal infrastructure, upgrades to test tracks, an expanded and upgraded maintenance facility, and an upgraded yard. Contracts have been awarded for the following projects as part of this initiative:
Orange Line signal upgrades: Design begun in 2019, expected completion in May 2022.
Digital signals require less manual labor than the current analog system, reducing the time and money required for maintenance. This will result in improved service reliability, a renewed lifespan for the entire system, and more efficient communications about system diagnostics.
Wellington Yard and Maintenance Facility updates: Wellington Yard work began in spring 2018 and is anticipated to be complete in spring 2021; Maintenance Facility work began in summer 2017 and is anticipated to be complete in spring 2021.
The upgraded and expanded Wellington Yard will make it easier for crews to move vehicles around the facility, decreasing the time needed for maintenance.
Will feature all new tracks, power systems, and signals; expanded vehicle storage space; more space for vehicle maintenance; new diagnostics equipment; and an efficient, environmentally friendly car wash.

The following projects are now complete:
Rehabilitation of Orange Line test track: Completed summer 2018.
Storage track expansions at Wellington Yard: Completed spring 2019.

MBTA and Orange Line Investments
The $8 billion that the MBTA plans to spend over the next five years is the most in any five-year period ever—and this funding will have tangible results and provide a more reliable ride for MBTA customers.

The MBTA is investing nearly $2 billion in the Red and Orange Line improvement program, which will completely replace the cars, replace the signal systems, and upgrade track and maintenance facilities for both lines.
The MBTA is investing $350 million on the signal systems and $470 million for track and maintenance facility upgrades.

The MBTA has also made a number of investments along the Orange Line since 2015 including replacing third rail, replacing track, and signal work.
For more information, visit www.mbta.com/OLcars.

Written By: Klark Jessen. Article from the MassDOT Blog

 

MBTA Announces Accelerated Schedule for System Upgrades, Cuts Project Timelines

The MBTA today announced several planned system upgrade construction projects will be accelerated, shortening some timelines by as much as eleven months for certain projects. System upgrade work to improve reliability for riders on the Green, Red, and Orange Lines that was previously scheduled to take place only during limited overnight hours will now take place during entire weekends, requiring shuttle service around certain stations.

The accelerated work plans approved by the Fiscal and Management Control Board will deliver benefits to riders significantly faster and allow T crews to undertake multiple projects at the same time as opposed to performing projects one after the other during the limited overnight hours.

In June, the Baker-Polito Administration announced as part of the $8 billion, five-year plan to modernize the MBTA, transportation officials would speed up planned work to improve the system faster. MBTA officials also announced they plan to undertake additional acceleration plans in the near future.

“Riders deserve a reliable, safe transportation system and while we understand this accelerated plan will be inconvenient for some riders, we believe these temporary diversions are necessary to improve the system that has been neglected for decades,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “The MBTA will continue to evaluate upcoming planned projects for this fall and next year for additional opportunities to accelerate work where possible.”

“We know that diversions in service are an inconvenience in the short term, but these shutdowns will allow us to quicken the pace of investments in the system more efficiently and effectively,” said MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak. “We’ve heard loud and clear that we need to accelerate the pace of improvements. This is an especially important opportunity for the MBTA to replace track in areas that aren’t accessible to work crews without these shutdowns. We’re taking a holistic approach in getting as much work done as possible, and we’re hopeful that customers will see and feel these incremental advances in reliability and the customer experience.”

Accelerated Projects:
 Green Line Intersection Upgrades: The MBTA is making 30 intersection upgrades on the B and C branches to mitigate the risk of service interruptions by replacing aged track.
The acceleration plan condenses planned work by five months, by increasing the number of weekend diversions from 10 to 14 on these branches.
This will help complete the project by December 2019 instead of May 2020.
The T will now also replace 7,000 feet of track during the planned weekend diversions.
Green Line D branch shutdowns are already scheduled for the weekends of September 14-15, September 21-22, September 28-29, October 5-6, October 12-13, October 26-27, November 2-3, November 9-10, November 16-17, November 23-24, December 7-8, December 14-15, December 21-22, and December 28-29.
Three new weekend closures on the Green Line B branch will take place during the weekends of September 7-8, November 2-3, and November 23-24.
One new weekend closure on the Green Line C branch will take place on October 26-27.
Red Line: Park Street Wayfinding and Station Improvements: The MBTA is replacing and adding new wayfinding signage, adding 1,250 new lighting fixtures, and cleaning, painting, and repairing stairs/tile within the station.
The acceleration plan condenses planned work by four months, by doing four new weekend diversions on the Red Line in November and December 2019.
This will help complete the project by December 2019 instead of April 2020.
The T will now also replace 900 feet of track and do tactile edge replacement on platforms during the diversions.
Four new weekend diversions will take place between Kendall/MIT and Broadway on November 16-17, November 23-24, December 7-8, and December 14-15.
Red Line: Downtown Crossing Wayfinding and Station Improvements: The MBTA is replacing and adding new wayfinding signage, and cleaning, painting, and repairing stairs/tile within the station.
The acceleration plan condenses planned work by 11 months, by doing four new weekend diversions on the Red Line in November and December 2019.
This will help complete the project by December 2019 instead of November 2020.
The T will also replace 900 feet of track and do tactile edge replacement work on platforms during the diversions.
Four new weekend diversions will take place between Kendall/MIT and Broadway on November 16-17, November 23-24, December 7-8, and December 14-15.
Orange Line: Downtown Crossing, Haymarket, and State Wayfinding and Station Improvements: The MBTA is replacing and adding new signage and cleaning, painting, and repairing stairs/tile within the station.
The acceleration project will condense the project timeline by 11 months through six new weekend diversions on the Orange Line in October and November 2019.
The T will also now replace 2,250 feet of track and clean and paint within Chinatown Station.
Six new weekend diversions will take place between Tufts Medical Center and Sullivan Square on October 5-6, October 12-13, October 19-20, October 26-27, November 2-3, and November 9-10.

These projects will mitigate the risk of service interruptions, improve safety for passengers, improve on-time performance, increase accessibility, and improve the customer experience.

The MBTA is also in the process of preparing an aggressive schedule of shutdowns for the 2020 construction season that may include weekday shutdowns in addition to a greater frequency of weekend shutdowns. Details of this plan are anticipated to be released in fall 2019.

Details on Work
Red Line

Four new weekend closures on the Red Line between Kendall/MIT and Broadway Stations will take place in November and December 2019 to accelerate the pace of Red Line improvement work. The broad limits between Kendall/MIT and Broadway are necessary as these areas are “portal” access points for work crews to load in construction equipment and materials into the underground portions of the Red Line where work will take place. During these weekend shutdowns, alternate service will be provided with a robust communication plan in place to provide information to customers.

Work specific to improvements on the Red Line levels at Park Street and Downtown Crossing Stations will take place during these four new weekends, including improvements to the condition and appearance of each station, upgraded wayfinding/signage in compliance with accessibility standards, cleaning work, painting, and other needed repairs. The addition of these four weekend shutdowns also means that Park Street’s improvement work will occur four months earlier than previously planned and nearly a year earlier at Downtown Crossing’s Red Line level.

During these four new weekend shutdowns on the Red Line, MBTA crews and contractors are also able to remove and completely replace the “pit track” in closed stations. The Red Line pit track in these areas is over thirty years old and, while safe to travel over at reduced speeds, is ready to be replaced. Pit track is the track within the station itself, which isn’t accessible to work crews without a complete shutdown.
The broad closure limits during these four added weekends in November and December 2019 also give the MBTA a valuable work window to perform additional maintenance at closed stations that include repairs to platform edges, escalators, elevators, stairways, and fare equipment. During these four weekends, MBTA crews and contractors will also perform track and power maintenance in the tunnels between stations, including the complete replacement of third rail insulators and third rail electrical connections. Tunnel debris clean-up work will take place as well, reducing the risk of smoke and fire hazards.

Orange Line
Six new weekend closures on the Orange Line between Tufts Medical Center and Sullivan Square Stations will take place in October and November 2019 to accelerate the pace of Orange Line improvement work. As with the Red Line’s broad limits in added weekend closures, the broad limits between Tufts Medical Center and Sullivan Square are necessary as these areas are “portal” access points for work crews to load in construction equipment and materials into the underground portions of the Orange Line. During these weekend shutdowns, alternate service will be provided with a robust communication plan in place to provide information to customers.

Work specific to improvements on the Orange Line levels at Downtown Crossing, Haymarket, and State Stations will take place during these six new weekends, including improvements to the condition and appearance of each station, upgraded wayfinding/signage, cleaning work, painting, and other needed repairs. The addition of these six weekend shutdowns allows the MBTA to complete work on the Orange Line level of these three stations almost a year earlier than previously planned.

As with the Red Line’s added weekend closures, MBTA crews and contractors will also remove and completely replace the pit track in closed Orange Line stations during these six weekend closures, which would not be accessible to work crews without a complete shutdown. The Orange Line pit track in these areas is thirty to forty years old and, while safe to travel over at reduced speeds, is also ready to be replaced.

Similar to the Red Line’s added weekend closures, the broad closure limits on the Orange Line during these six added weekends in October and November 2019 also give the MBTA a valuable work window to perform repairs to platform edges, escalators, elevators, stairways, and fare equipment; perform track and power maintenance in the tunnels between stations, including the complete replacement of third rail insulators and third rail electrical connections; and perform tunnel debris clean-up work, reducing the risk of smoke and fire hazards.

Green Line
Four new weekend closures on the Green Line B and C branches will take place in September, October, and November 2019 to accelerate the pace of upgrades at thirty Green Line grade crossings at intersections where tracks are crossed by city streets. The addition of these four weekend shutdowns allows the MBTA to complete the work on the Green Line B and C branches five months earlier than previously planned. During these weekend shutdowns, shuttle bus service will be provided with customers encouraged to anticipate an additional fifteen to twenty minutes of travel time.

During these four new weekend shutdowns on the Green Line, MBTA crews and contractors are also able to remove and completely replace an additional 7,000 feet of track on the B and C branches. About 60 percent of the Green Line track in these areas is over thirty years old and, while safe to travel over, is ready to be replaced.

Following the completion of this work, the MBTA anticipates the Green Line operating more reliably with a reduced risk of track issues and the elimination of some speed restrictions, translating into a faster trip for customers. Upgraded grade crossings at Green Line intersections also mean improved access for pedestrians and safer areas where Green Line tracks meet walkway areas.

The MBTA understands that shutdowns are a temporary inconvenience, but appreciates customers’ understanding as the accelerated pace of work will improve future service faster. Complete shutdowns in service provide the T with valuable work windows to address infrastructure improvements and maintenance work that could not otherwise be performed without these closures.

 For more information, please visit mbta.com/BuildingABetterT

Written By: Klark Jessen

Article from the MassDOT Blog 

 

First Zero-emission, Battery-electric Buses Join the MBTA Silver Line Fleet

Governor Charlie Baker, MassDOT Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack, and MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak gathered at the Southampton Bus Garage and Maintenance Facility to celebrate the introduction of the MBTA’s first brand new, zero-emission, battery-electric bus (BEB) prototypes into the MBTA’s Silver Line fleet.

“The procurement and testing of new battery-electric bus technology is exactly the type of investment we aim to continue with the Transportation Bond Bill in order to help the MBTA plan for the future,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “Our Administration will continue to explore ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the Commonwealth’s transportation system and we look forward to more improvements as the MBTA makes progress on delivering a more reliable bus system.”

“Testing the operational capabilities of these zero-emission prototypes by the MBTA is part of the Commonwealth’s commitment to reducing emissions in a changing climate,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “This emerging vehicle technology is something we hope to continue to explore with investments from the Transportation Bond Bill as the MBTA analyzes how these new buses can deliver better service.”

“These new zero-emission, completely battery-electric bus prototypes are an emerging technology aimed at providing a safe, reliable, comfortable ride while lowering energy costs and reducing dependence on fossil fuels,” said Transportation Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack. “We are pleased to take steps forward with the process of evaluating whether these kinds of new technologies that promote sustainability are appropriate for daily service for MBTA customers.”

“We’re excited to introduce these first battery-electric buses into service on the Silver Line to test how they operate in real-world conditions on Boston streets and in the Silver Line tunnel,” said MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak. “This is an exciting first step in testing new technologies to electrify our bus fleet, save on fuel costs, and reduce our maintenance needs. We look forward to seeing how these buses perform, gathering data on power consumption, and testing their range during extreme weather as we continue to seek ways to reduce greenhouse gases and improve service for our customers.”

With support from a $10 million federal grant, the MBTA procured from New Flyer the production of five zero-emission, battery-electric, 60-foot, articulated buses. All five are currently in Boston with the first BEB prototype having arrived in April 2019 to begin testing and operator training. Three BEBs are entering service today on Silver Line Routes SL2, SL3, SL4, and SL5 with the next two anticipated to enter service on these routes by the end of the summer.

Five charging stations are also being built within the Southampton Bus Garage and Maintenance Facility as part of the project where each BEB will be “refueled” overnight.

These BEBs are powered by both rear axle and center axle electric motors to enhance safe operation during the winter months. The majority of 60-foot Low Floor articulated buses in service in North America utilize only the rear axle to provide propulsion power by pushing the bus, which can experience traction issues during winter months when snow and ice are present. The performance of the BEBs’ axle placement will be one feature specifically tested and studied while in service.

The MBTA will also be one of the first systems to test 100 percent electric heat for comfortable onboard temperatures during winter months. Previously, U.S.-built BEBs operated diesel-fired auxiliary heaters.

With a commitment to vehicle efficiency, energy conservation, and sustainability, the MBTA continues to explore available technologies and new vehicles that are capable of zero-emissions operation in the Silver Line Transitway Tunnel, which serves the World Trade Center, Courthouse, and South Station stops. Innovative projects like the MBTA Silver Line Zero Emission Bus Project directly reduce Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions and also help improve ridership by offering a quieter, emission-free transit experience.

During a two-year period following the introduction of the BEBs into service, the MBTA will test and gather data on this emerging technology to measure BEB performance and operational effectiveness with a focus on power consumption of electric heaters, operator / passenger comfort, vehicle range impact during extreme conditions, charging requirements, and projected operating costs. The MBTA will operate these buses on Silver Line routes to measure the capabilities of the technology for consideration in future zero-emission bus procurements.

Over the past four years, the Baker-Polito Administration has invested unprecedented levels of funding for transit improvements that have included the purchase of hundreds of new buses as well as the purchase of hybrid vehicles:

• The MBTA has purchased 575 new buses with 381 already in service and 194 additional hybrid buses in production.

• More than one third of the bus fleet was recently replaced. Once the additional hybrid buses are in service, more than half of all MBTA buses will be less than five years old. These new buses replace the oldest and least fuel-efficient vehicles in the fleet and provide a more comfortable ride for passengers.

• The piloting of these five zero-emission, battery-electric buses is also the first step in testing new technologies to electrify the fleet.

• In April 2018, the MBTA introduced the Silver Line 3-Chelsea service, providing a direct link between Chelsea and the Seaport District. This project was the first new MBTA service since the Greenbush Commuter Rail Line came online in 2017 with the $56.7 million project jointly funded by MassDOT ($7.6 million) and the MBTA ($49.1 million).

• Following positive results from a Transit Signal Priority (TSP) pilot, the FMCB approved plans to expand the T’s TSP pilot to include broad corridors of the MBTA street-level system. TSP provides faster service to bus passengers by using signal technology to reduce dwell times for vehicles that operate in mixed traffic.

• As part of the Better Bus Project, the MBTA has partnered with cities and towns to implement dedicated bus lanes and queue jumps, resulting in faster trips for bus passengers. Bus lanes currently exist on Brighton Avenue in Allston, Washington Street in Roslindale, Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge, Mount Auburn Street in Cambridge and Watertown, and Broadway in Everett.

• The MBTA is currently investing more than ever before to upgrade its infrastructure under its current $8 billion, five-year Capital Investment Plan already in place, and the Baker-Polito Administration’s Transportation Bond Bill includes approximately $5.7 billion for the MBTA to continue funding improvements.

The bond bill also includes a number of proposals to accelerate capital investments that include investments in the MBTA’s bus system, including continued funding for the dedicated bus lanes, signal prioritization, bus shelters and other infrastructure; for sustainable transit system modernization investments to modernize the bus fleet and support the Better Bus Project; and for maintaining the bus fleet and operational improvements. There are additional provisions to allow for the use of design-build procurement for smaller projects, which reduces the timeline for delivering capital improvements, and job-order contracting, which is a faster, more cost effective way to address outstanding maintenance needs. The bill would also establish a process to leverage private-sector investment to fund and build transit improvements.

The provisions in the bond bill that seek to expedite the T’s pace of investment come on the heels of the T’s plan to accelerate capital investments by exploring more aggressive closures overnight and on weekends, increasing the regimen of proactive inspections, negotiating with contractors to compress project schedules, augmenting the existing workforce with a flexible team that can provide necessary services such as flaggers, bus operators, and power, signal, and track personnel to support capital investments.

Written By: Klark Jessen

Article from the MassDOT Blog 

 

MassDOT Releases State Bicycle and Pedestrian Plans

Transportation Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack today joined Highway Administrator Jonathan Gulliver, members of the Massachusetts Legislature, local officials, and transportation advocates at a groundbreaking event in Natick to release the State Bicycle Transportation Plan and State Pedestrian Transportation Plan and to celebrate the start of construction on the latest segment of the Cochituate Rail Trail.

“The Baker-Polito Administration is pleased to release the final State Bicycle Transportation Plan and State Pedestrian Transportation Plan and continue implementing our vision for Massachusetts in which all people have a safe, comfortable and convenient option to walk or bike for short, every day trips,” said MassDOT Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack. “The Cochituate Rail Trail is an example of our strategy to make multimodal investments to lessen the demand for new vehicle trips, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, place less strain on household transportation expenses, and promote public health.”

The final State Bicycle Transportation Plan and State Pedestrian Transportation Plan each have the goal of increasing safety and the percentage of trips made by walking and bicycling. They include the vision, goals, principles, definitions of key terms, overview of the planning process, the state of walking and bicycling today, and an action plan to achieve the Plans’ goals.

The plans recommend policies, programs, and projects for MassDOT to guide decision making and capital investments. MassDOT has a total of $60 million programmed in the FY 2019-FY 2023 Capital Investment Plan for implementation of both the State Pedestrian Transportation Plan and State Bicycle Transportation Plan.

As part of the Plans, MassDOT released two companion documents – the Municipal Resource Guide for Bikeability and the Municipal Resource Guide for Walkability – in recognition of the important role local cities and towns play. The purposes of the guides are to support cities and towns in their efforts to improve bikeability and walkability as the vast majority of roadways are under local ownership.

Meanwhile, the groundbreaking event today showcased a $12.4 million multimodal project to construct 2.4 miles of the Cochituate Rail Trail between Framingham and Natick.  This project includes replacing a bridge over Route 9 and building a grade-separated crossing at Route 30. This will create a connection between the existing section of the trail in Framingham, the Natick Mall, and Route 27 in Natick. Construction is expected to be completed in 2021.

The Massachusetts Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Board served as the steering committee for the State Bicycle Transportation Plan and the State Pedestrian Transportation Plan.  Over the last two years, the plans were informed by public input and data analysis.

Access the full Bicycle Plan.

Access the full Pedestrian Plan.

Baker-Polito Administration Announces $5 Million in MassTrails Grants for 71 Projects

Continuing efforts to support the state’s vast network of trails, the Baker-Polito Administration today announced $5 million in MassTrails Grants to 71 projects throughout the Commonwealth. The grants will provide assistance for the construction, maintenance, and improvements for a variety of public trails throughout the state trails system, such as hiking trails, bikeways, and shared-use paths. The announcement was made by Lieutenant Governor Polito during an event in Lowell. 

“Massachusetts is home to thousands of miles of public trails, and today’s MassTrails Grants will aid in the improvement of these trails and assist in the creation of new sections for the public to enjoy,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “The MassTrails Grants serve as a great example of our administration’s dedication to ensuring that the Commonwealth’s natural, cultural, and recreational resources remain accessible for years to come.”

“Our administration is proud to prioritize the state trails system, which builds community pride, connects municipalities, and improves quality of life throughout Massachusetts,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “By working in partnership to support these 71 trail projects, we are able to invest in the enhancement of our communities, and ensure natural resources are protected and available for all to appreciate and enjoy.”

MassTrails Grants focus on the improvement of existing trails, the construction of new trails, and the maintenance of the statewide trail system. This year’s projects include facility landscaping and amenities installation; land surveys and design plans; evaluation of off-road bikeway connections; culvert repair and gradient restoration; hiring of trail staff; structure construction; installation and maintenance of directional and interpretive trail signage; development and creation of GIS mapping and trails guides; purchasing of trail maintenance equipment; and upgrading existing trails to accessible trail standards.

“The 2019 MassTrails Grants showcase diverse trail projects throughout Massachusetts, and will ultimately increase outdoor recreational opportunities and encourage residents and visitors to lead healthy active lifestyles,” said Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Secretary Kathleen Theoharides. “The Baker-Polito Administration remains committed to supporting municipalities and local organizations to achieve our shared goal to conserve and protect the Commonwealth’s natural resources while also increasing access to the natural world around us.”

“The Baker-Polito Administration is pleased to continue working with residents, community leaders, and other stakeholders to design and build a connected network of shared-use paths for mobility and recreation throughout the Commonwealth,” said Transportation Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack. “These grant awards will allow continued investments in our trail networks, closing gaps that exist, expanding the shared-use path network, and enabling more members of the public to reach destinations in a safe, efficient, and healthy manner.”

Funding for MassTrails Grants comes from the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation’s (DCR) capital budget, and from the motor fuel excise tax on off-road vehicles including ATV’s and snowmobiles, which is provided by the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Surface Transportation Act, in coordination with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT). All MassTrails Grant applications have been reviewed in consultation with an inter-agency MassTrails Team and the Massachusetts Recreational Trails Advisory Board (MARTAB). Additionally, each recipient matches awarded grants with a minimum of twenty percent in funding or in-kind services for the designated project. This year’s total investment, including matching funds, is approximately $14 million. In order to meet their funding obligation, an organization is able to utilize a variety of methods to fund at least twenty percent of the project’s total cost to receive the grant. Methods include in-kind labor and professional services, material donations, use of equipment, or a cash match. Funding is made available to registered non-profits and municipal, state, and federal agencies.

“This grant is going to improve our snowmobile trail signage for years to come, I want to say thank you to the Baker-Polito Administration and DCR for these funds,” said Adam Sokoloski, Conway Snowmobile Club.

“We are very excited to receive this grant,” said Mark Emmons, Bourne Rail Trail. “It is going to be instrumental for our design efforts to connect the Cape Cod Canal to the Shining Sea Bike Path.”

“We want to thank the Baker-Polito Administration for establishing the MassTrails program,” said Colleen Abrams, Wachusett Greenways. “Multi-use tails are the new front porch of our communities and Wachusett Greenways is thrilled to continue to partner in building the Mass Central Rail Trail.”

“Mass Audubon is delighted to received support from the Baker-Polito Administration and DCR to construct an accessible trail to provide recreational opportunities to all at our Tidmarsh Wildlife Sanctuary in Plymouth,” Mary Griffin, Mass Audubon.

“This grant will help connect all of our ski  trails together and enhance the Greylock Glenn as a place for all ages to recreate,” said Heather Linscott, Thunderbolt Ski Runners. “We thank the Baker-Polito Administration and DCR for their partnership in this important project.”

MassTrails Grant projects are located within the following municipalities: Adams, Amherst, Ashfield, Athol, Avon, Barnstable, Belchertown, Belmont, Boston, Bourne, Braintree, Brockton, Cambridge, Conway, Dedham, Deerfield, Edgartown, Fitchburg, Franklin, Foxboro, Groton, Great Barrington, Hancock, Hardwick, Hawley, Holden, Holliston, Ipswich, Kingston, Lawrence, Leverett, Lowell, Lunenburg, Lynn, Malden, Mansfield, Marblehead, Marshfield, Melrose, Montague, Monterey, Needham, New Bedford, Newton, North Adams, Orange, Palmer, Pembroke, Plainville, Plymouth, Rowley, Salem, Salisbury, Sandisfield, Savoy, Sheffield, Somerville, Springfield, Sturbridge, Sunderland, Swampscott, Townsend, Waltham, Ware, Westborough, Westfield, West Tisbury, Wendell, Whately, Williamstown, Winsor, and Worthington. A full list and brief description of each of the 71 projects receiving a grant can be found on the MassTrails Grants webpage.

“We must continue to take concrete steps to ensure our open space and recreational opportunities remain accessible for future generations to come,” said Senate President Karen Spilka (D-Ashland). “These MassTrails Grants will go a long way in helping our communities utilize their open space and bring benefits to local communities while helping advance our broader environmental goals in the Commonwealth.”

“I am extremely grateful to the Baker-Polito Administration for these generous grants to support our hiking trails and bike paths in the Plymouth and Barnstable District,” said State Senator Vinny deMacedo (R-Plymouth). “The trails and paths supported by these grants are assets to our economy that attract visitors and local residents to enjoy the natural beauty of Plymouth and Cape Cod. These projects are extremely important to these communities, and I am excited that the Administration’s continued partnership will allow them to be enjoyed by many future generations.”

“Creating the Connector Trail to connect the Concord River Greenway to the Bruce Freeman Rail Trail has long been a priority of the city of Lowell as we continue to work to provide accessible opportunities both for recreation and pedestrian traffic, getting more people out of their cars and onto their feet,” said State Senator Ed Kennedy (D-Lowell). “Showcasing aerosol art along the path makes for a unique and interesting outdoor art gallery for all to enjoy. I am looking forward to the completion of this exciting project.”

“I would like to thank the Baker-Polito Administration for awarding the MassTrails grants which will further enhance public trails in the Greater Lowell area,” said State Representative Thomas A. Golden, Jr. (D-Lowell), Chairman of the Joint Committee on Telecommunications, Utilities, and Energy. “These grants will facilitate significant improvements to the Connector Trail project in Lowell by paving a portion which connects pedestrians to shopping centers and neighborhoods, as well as allow the creation of a digital, interactive map of trails in the Greater Lowell area.”

“It is always great to see the Administration’s commitment to our city,” said State Representative David Nangle (D-Lowell). “This grant means access to more open recreational space for our residents to enjoy.”

Written By: Klark Jessen
Article from the MassDOT Blog 

MassDOT Announces Annual Safe Streets Smart Trips High School Video Contest

MassDOT is announcing the sixth annual statewide high school video contest, Safe Streets Smart Trips. The contest serves as an initiative within the Massachusetts Strategic Highway Safety Plan to promote and educate the public about safe walking, bicycling, and driving behaviors. The contest began five years ago to encourage high school students to showcase their understanding of roadway safety across all travel modes to try to decrease pedestrian and bicyclist injuries and fatalities.

“We are pleased to once again be able to give students the opportunity to create educational videos which underscore messages in the ‘Scan the Streets for Wheels and Feet’ initiative,” said MassDOT Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack. “The video contest has resulted in very creative ideas during the last few years and we look forward to seeing what teenagers will produce during this year’s contest to make the public more aware of safe behaviors while traveling.”

In summer 2017, MassDOT launched a new statewide campaign to raise awareness about motorists, pedestrians and cyclists safely sharing the Commonwealth’s streets. This initiative reminds travelers to “Scan the Street for Wheels and Feet.” The campaign slogan emphasizes the notion that everyone who is traveling on a roadway is responsible for doing their part to ensure safety.

The video contest, open to all Massachusetts high school students, features a freshman/sophomore category and junior/senior category. Per contest guidelines, students are asked to write and produce a one-minute commercial video that focuses on one or several of the crash statistics from the campaign and uses the slogan, “Scan the Street for Wheels and Feet.”

Complete contest guidelines are being sent to high schools and are also found at the Roadway Safety Video website. Grand prize and runner-up videos in each category will be chosen by a MassDOT panel during October 2019. Winning videos will be screened at MassDOT’s annual active transportation conference, Moving Together, where the creators will receive prizes. Top videos may also be used in future safety campaigns on MBTA digital boards.

Learn more about the Safe Streets Smart Trips high school video contest or call 857-383-3807.

Learn more information about the annual Moving Together healthy transportation conference.

Learn more about the “Scan the Street for Wheels and Feet” campaign.

 Written By: Klark Jessen
Article from the MassDOT Blog

 

 

MassDOT Selects 14 Municipalities for Safe Routes to School Program Awards

MassDOT is pleased to announce that a total of 14 municipalities have received infrastructure project awards through the Massachusetts Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Program. The selected projects are distributed across the Commonwealth, with at least one project located in each MassDOT Highway District. Projects were selected in the following municipalities:

Agawam: Robinson Park School and Roberta Doering School
Arlington: Stratton Elementary School
Boston: Ellis Elementary School
Dracut: George Englesby Elementary School
Fairhaven: LeRoy L. Wood Elementary School
Gardner: Elm Street Elementary School
Grafton: Millbury Street Elementary School
Harwich: Harwich Elementary School
Leominster: Frances Drake Elementary School
Longmeadow: Blueberry Hill Elementary School
Medway: Burke-Memorial Elementary School and Medway Middle School
Nantucket: Nantucket Elementary and Intermediate Schools
North Adams: Brayton Elementary School
Northampton: Bridge Street Elementary School
All of the projects will include creating some form of pedestrian/bicycle improvements such as sidewalk reconstruction, sidewalk infill, intersection and crossing improvements, ADA accessibility improvements, signage and striping, traffic calming, shared use paths, or bicycle accommodations.

“These 14 awards will ensure that communities from Nantucket to North Adams will have projects to provide safe and healthy transportation options for schoolchildren of the Commonwealth,” said MassDOT Highway Administrator Jonathan Gulliver. “We were very pleased to see such a diverse and competitive group of submissions that all shared great vision on how to improve access to active and safe transportation for schools and communities.”

MassDOT announced a new round of infrastructure project funding for the SRTS Program on November 28, 2018. Public and charter schools involved with the Program’s non-infrastructure initiatives relating to education, encouragement, enforcement and evaluation were eligible to apply. All projects were required to be within two miles of a school serving any grades from kindergarten to eighth grade, with a focus on increasing student safety and/or the number of students walking and biking to school. Proposed projects included both the construction of new facilities and the improvement of existing infrastructure.

Funding for the program included $15 million of Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) funds set aside for SRTS projects in the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) spread across federal fiscal years 2022, 2023, and 2024. The selected projects will soon begin the project initiation and design process before being scheduled for construction in the STIP.

The Massachusetts SRTS Program is a federally-funded initiative of MassDOT. SRTS works with schools, communities, students, and families to increase active transportation among elementary and middle school students in the Commonwealth. SRTS promotes a collaborative, community-focused approach that fosters mutual partnerships between advocacy groups, law enforcement, education leaders and public health departments to promote safer routes for elementary and middle school students. The program currently serves over 875 schools in more than 220 communities across the Commonwealth.

For more information on Massachusetts Safe Routes to School: visit SRTS at our website: https://www.mass.gov/safe-routes-to-school

 Written By: Klark Jessen
Article from the MassDOT blog

Attendees
First Name Affiliation
Dennis WSP
Alan VHB
Kelly VHB
Genevieve Michael Baker International
James AECOM
Jamie Stantec
Stephen Nitsch Engineering
Robert CHA Companies (NH)
Rachel MassMobility
Marylouise Executive Office of Elder Affairs
Kristine Jacobs Engineering Group
Raymond AECOM
John Stantec
Heather HDR
Christine BETA Group, Inc.
David Beals and Thomas, Inc.
Kate Michael Baker International
Carrie HDR
Christine AI Engineers, Inc. (MA)
Jay City Point Partners, LLC
Kelly BSC Group, Inc.
Laureeen Brennan Consulting, Inc.
Glenn Big R Bridge (Corporate)
William Green International Affiliates
Matthew Fuss & O'Neill Inc. (Springfield)
Sharna Human Service Transportation
J M Ocean State Signal Co.
Judy Pavers by Ideal
James Kleinfelder, Inc. (Boston)
John WSP
Rebecca Jacobs Engineering Group
Jennifer FHWA MA
Joshua FHWA MA
Jeff FHWA MA
Ken FHWA MA
Cassandra FHWA MA
Michael FHWA MA
Amy FHWA MA
Brandon FHWA MA
Daryl MassDOT District 2
John MassDOT
Jessica MassDOT
Lyris MassDOT
John MassDOT Highway Division
Corinna MassDOT
David MassDOT Information Technology
Stephen MassDOT District 3
Robbin MassDOT
Kevin MBTA
Lorraine MassDOT Aeronautics Division
Ethan MassDOT
Emily MassDOT Safe Routes to School Program
Eric MBTA
Christopher MassDOT District 6
Kelley MBTA
Luka MassDOT
Anthony MassDOT District 6
Michael MassDOT
Alex MassDOT
Judith MassDOT Safe Routes to School Program
Andrea MassDOT
Jeffrey MassDOT Aeronautics Division
John MassDOT
Alex MassDOT
Michelle MassDOT
Thomas MassDOT
Susan MassDOT
Alexander MassDOT District 5
Joshua MBTA
Christopher MassDOT
Kate MassDOT
Ana MassDOT
Kevin MassDOT
E Jenny MassDOT Highway Division
Michael MassDOT
Hanan MassDOT
Brian MBTA
Jonathan MassDOT
Michael MassDOT
Denise MassDOT Aeronautics Division
Michael MassDOT Aeronautics Division
Robert MassDOT
David MassDOT
Christian MassDOT District 1
Akshay MassDOT
Haider MassDOT
Diane MassDOT Safe Routes to School Program
Susan MassDOT
Pamela MassDOT District 5
Francisca MassDOT District 1
Patrick MassDOT Safe Routes to School Program
Michelle MassDOT
Jennifer MassDOT
Katherine MassDOT
Briana MassDOT
Paul MassDOT District 2
Eamon MassDOT
Valerie MassDOT
Derek MassDOT
Patricia MassDOT
Joshua Private Citizen
Koby MassDOT
Melissa MassDOT
Jessica MassDOT
Carmel MBTA
Jana MassDOT Safe Routes to School Program
Amitai MassDOT District 6
Kevin MassDOT
Benjamin MBTA
Walter MassDOT Highway Division
Matt MassDOT
Richard MassDOT District 2
Elizabeth MassDOT
Brittany MassDOT
Jeremy MassDOT
Omar MassDOT Safe Routes to School Program
Steven MassDOT
Ashli MBTA
Timothy MassDOT Highway Operations Center (HOC)
Benjamin MassDOT
Adam MassDOT District 3
Makaela MassDOT
Eric MassDOT
Corey MassDOT
Rachel MassDOT Safe Routes to School Program
Vivian MassDOT Safe Routes to School Program
Chester MassDOT Highway Operations Center (HOC)
Leon MassDOT Safe Routes to School Program
Paige MassDOT
Hasmukh MassDOT
Mary Joe MassDOT
Mary-Joe MassDOT District 5
Patsy MBTA
Irene MassDOT
Nathan MassDOT
Stephanie MassDOT
Sandhya MassDOT
Bryan MassDOT
Tom MBTA
Behnam MassDOT
Nathan MassDOT Aeronautics Division
Muazzez MassDOT
Dan MassDOT District 5
Laura MBTA
Jeovanny MassDOT District 6
Derrick MassDOT
Emmanuel MassDOT
Christopher MassDOT District 6
Erik MBTA
Thomas MassDOT
Shalini MBTA
Derek MassDOT
Owen MassDOT Aeronautics Division
Paula MassDOT District 2
Jose MassDOT
Tatyana MassDOT
James MassDOT
Linda MassDOT District 6
Stephanie MassDOT
Margo MassDOT
Diana MassDOT
Lori MassDOT District 6
Corrine MassDOT
Student #1 Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School - Student
Frank MassDOT District 4
Bryan MassDOT District 6
Maryanne MBTA
Bindu MassDOT
Michael MassDOT
Paul MassDOT
Zach MassDOT District 6
Andrew MassDOT
Steve MassDOT
Courtney MassDOT District 6
Gyujong MassDOT
Marianti MassDOT
Nicholas MassDOT
Alissa MassDOT
Warren MassDOT
Syed Federal Transit Administration
Joseph Rail Passengers Association
Matthew CDR Maguire (MA)
Eric Taunton Mass in Motion
Stefanie VHB
Josh VHB
Eric Fuss & O'Neill Inc. (Springfield)
Stacey WalkBoston
Chelsea VHB
Alex Tighe & Bond
Alicia Bike Newton
Benjamin BETA Group, Inc.
Michele TransAction Associates
Norman Bayside Engineering, Inc.
Rachel WSP
Donald Private Citizen
Allison Solomon Foundation
Nick FHI
Dan VHB
Teresa Bryant Associates, Inc.
Laura VHB
Davren CHA Consulting, Inc.
Matthew VHB
Mark Tufts University
Phillip WSP USA
Todd Hoyle Tanner & Associates
Alan WorldTech Engineering
Brian Nitsch Engineering
Justin BETA Group, Inc.
Kevin TEC, Inc. (NH)
Lourenco VHB
Tyler BETA Group, Inc.
Carol WSP
Trish VHB
Tom VHB
Cassidy Harvard University Commuter Choice
Caroline VHB
Rod WorldTech Engineering
Sean BSC Group, Inc. (Main Office)
James Charles River Transportation Management Association
Michael VHB
Dean Weston & Sampson
Birendra Nitsch Engineering
Heather BSC Group, Inc. (Main Office)
Ben Harvard University Commuter Choice
Niki VHB
Richard Halvorson Design Partnership
Ko Green International Affiliates
Lisa Barr Foundation
Jerry WSP
Darshan BETA Group, Inc.
Betsy Private Citizen
Kevin Fuss and O'Neill, Inc.
Vahid WSP
Brendan WalkBoston
Wayne Design Consultants, Inc. (Somerville)
Shanta VHB
Omar Private Citizen
Ian Nelson Nygaard
Traci Seaport TMA
David Hoyle Tanner & Associates
Nick Fuss & O'Neill Inc. (Springfield)
Tracie VHB
Kellan BSC Group, Inc. (Main Office)
Brendan VHB
Tom BETA Group, Inc.
Greg BETA Group, Inc.
Robert McFarland-Johnson, Inc.
Jeff BETA Group, Inc.
John WalkBoston
Bill WorldTech Engineering, LLC
Samuel TRC Companies
Eric VHB
Emily Green International Affiliates
Colleen City Point Partners, LLC
Ellen CHA Companies (NH)
Paul Gill Engineering
Joe City Point Partners, LLC
Herbert Solomon Foundation
Sean BSC Group, Inc. (Main Office)
Sam BSC Group, Inc. (Main Office)
Elizabeth TEC, Inc. (MA)
John HNTB Corporation
William BSC Group, Inc. (Main Office)
roger Private Citizen
Peter VHB
Jacqueline Nitsch Engineering
Essek VHB
Tom FPNA
Peter BSC Group, Inc. (Main Office)
Thomas Michael Baker International
Jonathan TEC, Inc. (MA)
Samantha VHB
Nick Acrow Corporation
Gregory VHB
Jeff Weston & Sampson
Adriana VHB
Michael BSC Group, Inc. (Main Office)
Jeremy HNTB Corporation
Mark AAA Northeast
Margot VHB
Leah Old Colony YMCA
Lisa CDM Smith (RI)
Matt BETA Group, Inc.
Rachael Walking In Arlington
Jim City Point Partners, LLC
Ashley Blue Hills Community Health Alliance (CHNA 20)
Greg Walker Consultants
Andrew CivilView, Inc.
Jasmine Green International Affiliates
Pat Seaport TMA
LeighAnne WalkBoston
Shruti WSP USA
Frank Green International Affiliates
Julia Institute for Transportation & Development Policy (ITDP) Boston
Josh Foursquare Integrated Transportation Planning
Eric Cogent
Kristine VHB
Wing Green International Affiliates
Bryan Nitsch Engineering
Joseph Cambridge Systematics, Inc.
Adam Dewberry
Imaikalani Town of Weston
Rana Pioneer Valley Planning Commission
Jeffrey City of Boston
Daniel Town of Arlington
Eleanor Town of Nantucket Planning & Land Use Services
Liana Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC)
Ryan FTA Region 1 (MA)
Kenn Town of Monterey
Michael City of Westfield
Ashley City of Boston Public Works Department
Todd City of Medford
Eric Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC)
Theodore Town of Arlington
Ed Town of Raynham
Mike Town of Nantucket Planning Office
Jeff City of Medford
Jacki Town of Andover
Catherine City of Waltham
Jen City of New Bedford
Jay City of Salem
Christopher City of Quincy
Jennifer SRPEDD
Michelle Massachusetts House of Representatives
Jeremy City of Westfield
Karen Merrimack Valley Planning Commission (MVPC)
Angie SRPEDD
Sergio Federal Transit Administration (FTA)
Mark City of Westfield
Austin Town of Acton
Jim Town of West Springfield
Michelle Federal Transit Administration (FTA)
Tom City of Salem
Sean Town of Oxford
Jennifer City of Gloucester Health Department
Jared Town of Brookline
Lisa SRPEDD
Alison Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC)
Russell City of Salem
Lorenz UMass Boston Bicycle History Collection
Margot Town of Bedford
Joseph City of Boston
Anthony Town of Weston
Edson Town of Brookline
Sophia Watertown Transportation Management Association
Matthew City of Westfield
Lizeth SRPEDD
Elizabeth Merrimack Valley Planning Commission (MVPC)
Michele Town of Hanover
Edward City of Quincy
Alex Federal Transit Administration (FTA)
Tabitha City of New Bedford
Richard Town of South Hadley
Kasia Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC)
David Town of Wellesley
Justin NMCOG
Elizabeth Town of Concord
Erika City of Framingham
Jacqueline SRPEDD
Penelope City of Worcester Division of Public Health
Matthew Federal Transit Administration (FTA)
Todd Town of Brookline
David City of Newton DPW
Jackson City of Boston
Sarah Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC)
Guoqiang SRPEDD
David Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC)
Jeremy Town of Natick
Dan Town of Brookline
Syrah City of Medford
Charles SRPEDD
Paul SRPEDD
Faye City of Newton
Dan Town of Sudbury
Bill Town of Maynard
Jack City of Salem
Steven Town of Westwood
Carla Town of Bedford
Glen Town of Andover Police Department
Melissa City of Newton
Eric FTA Region 1 (MA)
Nick Town of Concord
Joseph Town of Lexington
Emily City of Cambridge DPW
Travis Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC)
Ruth Town of Hanover
Isaac City of Newton
Marcia Town of Concord
Richard Town of Concord
Sarah City of Medford
Elijah Town of Bridgewater
Allison City of Quincy
James Town of Stow
Yaser City of Cambridge DPW
Marilyn FTA Region 1 (MA)
Lisa Town of Andover
Sam City of Framingham
Kara City of Melrose
Matt Town of Watertown
Jason City of Newton
Michael City of Boston
Emily City of Medford
Beth Town of Sudbury
Mike Town of South Hadley
Kathi Town of Concord
David Northern Middlesex Council of Governments
Jong Wai Northern Middlesex Council of Governments
Hoamy Central Mass Regional Planning Commission (CMRPC)
Daniel Town of Ayer
Natasha City of Lowell
Alfredo City of Newton
Juliet City of Portsmith (NH)
Zachary City of Boston
Rana Town of Everett
Marjorie Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC)
Mark Town of Ayer
Kristin Federal Transit Administration (FTA)
Corey Town of Acton
Jacob Town of Concord
Dennis Worcester Regional Transit Authority (WRTA)
Andreanne City of Medford
Miranda Tufts University
Jaime City of Newton
Stacey Northeastern University
Michael Northeastern University
Chris UMTC UMass Amherst
Michelle UMTC UMass Amherst
Sayeeda University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass)
Brenda UMTC UMass Amherst
Sarah UMTC UMass Amherst
Rebecca UMTC UMass Amherst
Karen UMTC UMass Amherst
Kathryn UMTC UMass Amherst
Cole UMTC UMass Amherst
Kim UMTC UMass Amherst
Greg UMTC UMass Amherst
Mike UMTC UMass Amherst
Lydia UMTC UMass Amherst
William Fort Hill Companies LLC
Matt UMTC UMass Amherst
Khang UMTC UMass Amherst
Thanh UMTC UMass Amherst
Robin UMTC UMass Amherst
Alyssa UMTC UMass Amherst
Cynthia UMTC UMass Amherst
Jack UMTC UMass Amherst
Michael UMTC UMass Amherst
Abbie UMTC UMass Amherst
Kris UMTC UMass Amherst
Francis UMTC UMass Amherst
Aldo UMTC UMass Amherst
Tracy UMTC UMass Amherst