The 2022 Moving Together Conference

Date: 11/1/2022 7:45 AM - 11/1/2022 4:00 PM

Location: Boston Park Plaza Hotel
50 Park Plaza

Boston, Massachusetts

Capacity:

135/700



Overview
MT22 logo

2022 Moving Together Conference

• Attend workshops and panels that highlight current pedestrian, bicyclist and public transportation topics

• Network with colleagues representing diverse interests from the public, academic and private sectors

• All new site visits and mobile workshops led by engineers and bicyclist/pedestrian advocates.

Register Today image

Registration is Now Open!!

November 1, 2022
Boston Park Plaza Hotel, Boston, MA • 7:30 am - 4:00 pm
with Virtual Attendance Option

Highlights of this year's conference will include:

• A keynote from the League of American Bicyclists.

• A session on long range planning including MassDOT’s 2050 Statewide Long Range Transportation Plan, Beyond Mobility.  Beyond Mobility will articulate a vision for the future of transportation in Massachusetts and document the most pressing transportation needs facing the Commonwealth between now and 2050. To learn more about Beyond Mobility, view upcoming events, and participate in the process, please visit mass.gov/beyond-mobility.

• 9th Annual High School Video Competition.

• MassDOT’s Route 128/I-95 Land Use and Transportation Study will establish the future land use, housing, and economic development assumptions for the segment of Route 128/I-95 between Newton and Lexington. The study will develop and analyze alternatives, present policy and infrastructure recommendations and develop an implementation plan to advance this corridor into the future.

The History of the Moving Together Conference

In 1998, both the statewide bicycling action plan and the statewide pedestrian action plan, called for the establishment of an annual statewide conference for educational and networking purposes. The first two of these conferences were held in Worcester, MA in 2000. In May, at Clark University, 50 people gathered to discuss only walking issues. Later in the year, at the Worcester Holiday Inn, 50 people focused only on bicycling issues.

In 2005, the conference moved to Boston. The first several years, the conference was held at the Marriott Courtyard on Tremont Street. Interest continued to grow until attendance hit approximately 250 persons and the conference moved to a larger venue at the Back Bay Sheraton.

The conference continued to grow and in 2013 the conference was held for the first time at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. Transit joined the conference as a featured mode. In 2014, more workshops than ever were offered along with the addition of site visits. Over 650 people attended the event. In 2016, the conference sold out for the second year straight! Each year the conference continues to bring together transportation leaders and individuals involved in the areas of planning, public health, bicyclist and pedestrian safety, transit, advocacy, elected office, law enforcement and education.

MassDOT Logo      FHWA Logo   

This event is accessible to people with disabilities and individuals with limited English proficiency. If you need a reasonable accommodation (such as American Sign Language Interpreters, assistive listening devices, handouts in alternate formats, etc.) and/or language assistance (such as translated documents or an interpreter) to fully participate, please contact Stephanie Cottrell at 413-800-2655 or scottrell@umass.edu at least 14 days prior to the event.  Such services are provided free of charge.

 

Gold Level Sponsors

Please click on our sponsor's logo to visit their website

   Vhb logo   Ai engineers

Silver Level Sponsors

Please click on our sponsor's logo to visit their website

BETA logo  

 

Bronze Level Sponsors

Please click on our sponsor's logo to visit their website

 
 
  

 

Registration
Amount

Private Sector
Register by 11/1/2022
Private Sector - $100.00 In-Person/$50.00 Virtual - You will be given the choice to attend In-Person or Virtually during registration process

Register

Public Sector and Non-Profit
Register by 11/1/2022
Public Sector and Non-Profit - $100.00 In-Person/$50.00 Virtual - You will be given the choice to attend In-Person or Virtually during registration process

Register

MassDOT
Register by 11/1/2022
MassDOT - You will be given the choice to attend In-Person or Virtually during registration process

Register

If you are having trouble registering, please email admin@umasstransportationcenter.org or call (413) 545-2604 for assistance.

Sponsor Fees
Amount

$3,250.00
Register by 11/1/2022
Gold Sponsor

Register

$1,750.00
Register by 11/1/2022
Silver Sponsor

Register

$1,000.00
Register by 11/1/2022
Bronze Sponsor

Register

$150.00
Register by 11/1/2022
Non-Profit Exhibitor

Register
Sponsors

What Moving Together Can Do For Your Company or Organization

When you exhibit at Moving Together, your company or organization will be seen by over 800 professionals involved in healthy transportation, planning, design, construction, public health, bike and pedestrian safety, transit, advocacy, elected offices, law enforcement and education. Take advantage of the opportunity to showcase your business or organization to the key decision makers involved in pedestrian, bicycle and public transportation. In addition, there are several opportunities to promote your company or organization through special sponsorship opportunities.

 

Online Sponsor/Exhibitor Registration Is Now Available!

Please click on the "Sponsor Fees" tab at the top of the page. 

Photos of the audience and exhibitor

Special Sponsorship Opportunities

Gold Level Sponsor

A GOLD Level Sponsor receives a booth space, skirted table and chair as well as the following:
Two complimentary attendee registrations
Your logo will also be included on:
• Event website (including link to sponsor’s website)
• Emails and direct mail marketing materials
• Event brochure that is distributed the morning of the event
• Shown during the conference slide show that is played throughout the event in the main ballroom
• Company banner displayed in main ballroom 
• Session agenda signs outside each meeting room

Cost: $3,250.00

 

Silver Level Sponsor

A SILVER Level Sponsor receives booth space, skirted table and chair as well as the following:
One complimentary attendee registration
Your logo will also be included on:
• Event website (including link to sponsor’s website)
• Emails and direct mail marketing materials
• Event brochure that is distributed the morning of the event.
• Shown during the conference slide show that is played throughout the event in the main ballroom.

Cost: $1,750.00

Bronze Level Sponsor

A BRONZE Level Sponsor receives booth space, skirted table and chair as well as the following:
Your logo will also be included on:
• Event website (including link to sponsor’s website)
• Event brochure that is distributed the morning of the event.
• Shown during the conference slide show played throughout the event in the main ballroom.

Cost: $1,000.00

Non Profit/Government Exhibitor

Includes an exhibit booth. Each agency attendee must pre-register online for the conference at $100.00 each. Agencies interested in being a sponsor must pay regular sponsor fees.

Each booth includes:
• 6 foot skirted table, one chair and one waste paper basket
• Additional chairs are available on request, depending on the number of attendees that your organization registers.
• Indicate any special considerations and requests, including electrical outlets. 

Vendors will be required to pay for any exhibit-specific audiovisual equipment, such as a table-top or free-standing TV-DVD. Please contact the UMass Transportation Center, 413-230-6791, for specific equipment costs.

Online Sponsor/Exhibitor Registration Now Available!

Please click on the "Sponsor Fees" tab at the top of the page.

2022 Sponsor/Exhibitor Package

We welcome walking, bicycle-friendly and transit-friendly vendors, businesses, professional planning/design/engineering services, educational and non-profit advocacy groups.

Questions can be directed to Kathryn Donnelly 413-230-6791.

News

Baker-Polito Administration Announces $16.4 Million in Shared Streets & Spaces Program Awards

BOSTON — The Baker-Polito Administration today announced $16.4 million for 184 new awards to 138 municipalities and seven Regional Transit Authorities through the Shared Streets and Spaces Program. The program provides technical assistance and project funding to help Massachusetts cities and towns design and implement changes to curbs, streets, and parking areas in support of public health, safe mobility, and community growth and revitalization. This round of funding placed particular emphasis on two new types of projects: those to reduce vehicle speeds in order to increase safety, and those to purchase equipment needed to improve and maintain infrastructure for active transportation. 

“Our Shared Streets and Spaces grant program is just one of the many municipal grant programs that has demonstrated what we can accomplish by working together with our partners at the local level,” said Governor Charlie Baker.  “Today’s announcement represents the largest award round since the program was launched and we are glad to be funding projects that reduce vehicular speeds and provide safe mobility for children, for seniors, to public transportation, housing, and to open space and parks.”

“We’ve been proud to award a total of $50 million dollars in grant funding to cities and towns to facilitate 494 projects since launching Shared Streets and Spaces during the COVID-19 pandemic in June of 2020,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “We are pleased to partner with local leaders to create safer and more connected cities and towns.”

This grant round also offered municipalities a new opportunity to apply for grants for up to $50,000 to purchase equipment to support active transportation. Eligible items include such things as snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities, speed feedback signs, pedestrian-activated warning devices such as Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons (RRFB), and bicycle lane delineators.

“With speeding and speeding-related crashes becoming more and more prevalent as we emerge from the pandemic, safety and driving at appropriate speeds has never been so important,” said Transportation Secretary and CEO Jamey Tesler. “MassDOT encourages municipalities to think strategically an implemented speed reduction measures to reduce crashes and the severity of injuries in crashes.  Many of the projects funded in this grant round will make our streets safer for everyone, whether they are walking, bicycling, taking public transportation or driving.”

Today’s announcement represents the largest award round since the program was launched in June 2020.  The awards made in this round provide funding to 138 municipalities and seven Regional Transit Authorities for a total of 184 individual grants. Of the awarded municipalities, 53% are designated Environmental Justice communities. A total of 31% of today’s award recipients have never received a Shared Streets and Spaces grant before.

The following cities, towns, and Regional Transit Authorities have been awarded Shared Streets and Spaces grants for construction projects in this funding round.

Abington received $198,539.00 to install ADA-compliant curb ramps, a crosswalk, RRFBs, speed feedback signs, and to reconstruct a portion of a sidewalk along Thicket Street and Old Randolph Street.

Adams received $190,314.00 to repair eleven pedestrian crosswalks along Columbia Street with new granite curbing and twenty-two ADA-compliant curb ramps, in addition to two RRFBs north of Valley Street and Burt Street.

Amesbury received $200,000.00 to add a bike lane from the Whittier Bridge to Merrimac Street.

Arlington received $143,910.56 to install a dedicated bicycle lane as well as pedestrian ‘bump-outs’ and an RRFB on a block of Chestnut Street between Chestnut Terrace and Medford Street.

Arlington, in partnership with the MBTA, received $133,640.00 to install an outbound shared bus/bike lane on Massachusetts Avenue from Alewife Brook Parkway to opposite Lafayette Street, to extend the existing inbound shared bus/bike lane from Boulevard Road to Alewife Brook Parkway, and to implement related pedestrian safety measures.

Auburn received $180,686.00 to install signage, speed enforcement equipment, and ADA-compliant crosswalk improvements.

Barnstable received $419,739.55 to implement transit accessibility and pedestrian safety improvements along Downtown Hyannis’ Main Street, including parklets and trolley stops as well as enhanced crosswalk markings and speed tables at intersections.

Bedford received $42,350.00 to install a crosswalk, ADA-compliant curb ramps, RRFBs, and signage on North Street across from Bedford Farms Ice Cream, a high pedestrian area.

Boston received $461,419.00 to create temporary dedicated bus/truck lanes and protected bike lanes in both directions along Summer Street from South Station to the Flynn Marine Industrial Park in South Boston.

Bourne received $200,00.00 to reconstruct the Academy Drive/Main Street intersection by repurposing roadway space in order to expand a sidewalk and install a curb extension.

Boylston received $187,723.80 to construct new sidewalks at intersections along Route 140 and Sewall Street, ADA-compliant curb ramps, a new pedestrian island with warning signs, RRFBs, and lane and striping changes to improve safety on Route 40.

Bridgewater received $200,00.00 to replace, widen, and upgrade three sidewalks on town-owned streets that run through the Bridgewater State University campus and serve as an important pedestrian connection to the MBTA Commuter Rail.

The Brockton Area Transit Authority received 163,300.00 to significantly improve BAT’s third busiest stop – the Westgate Mall in Brockton – by tripling the area designated for buses with an extended accessible platform and by installing shelters, wayfinding signs, and bicycle racks.

The Cape Ann Transit Authority, in partnership with Rockport, Gloucester, Ipswich, and Essex, received $302,937.17 to install shelters, benches, and schedule signage for fixed and seasonal routes that serve students, tourists, residents, and seniors.

Cohasset received $197,400.00 to install two crosswalks, ADA-compliant curb ramps, and extend the existing sidewalk on the north side of Sohier Street by 1,300 linear feet from Fairbanks Lane to the driveway of the Mobil Gas station and Pour Coffee & Bagel Company.

Concord received $197,663.75 to slow vehicular traffic at the Malden/Walden Street intersection with traffic calming, signage, new sidewalk, planters, and better pavement markings.

Cummington received $31,802.00 to upgrade a crosswalk with high-visibility striping and new ADA-compliant curb ramps in front of Community House/Church and Hillside Terrace Senior Housing on Main Street.

Danvers received $138,358.00 to create two new at-grade crossings for the Danvers Rail Trail on Maple Street and Hobart Road and to install ADA-compliant curb ramps, high-visibility crosswalks, lighting, RRFBs, signal-timing adjustments, and bicycle parking and wayfinding.

Dartmouth received $75,250.00 to transform a parking lot into a year-long pop-up space featuring attractions such as ice skating, food and drink vendors, seating, outdoor firepits, and patio heaters.

Deerfield received $113,118.00 to construct two new crosswalks, improve existing crosswalks with new ADA-compliant curb ramps, add RRFBs at three locations along North Main Street, including at the Frontier Regional School and the North Main Street Park (under construction).

Dennis received $95,000.00 to purchase and install radar speed feedback signs on the main roads leading to the northside beaches in order to provide safer pedestrian and bicycle access.

Dudley received $176,894.15 to construct 0.25 miles of sidewalk on Airport Road as well as install four crosswalks, ADA-compliant curb ramps, pedestrian crossing signage, white reflective paint to increase visibility, and bicycle lane delineators.

Eastham received $84,000.00 to install RRFBs at six intersections along the Cape Cod Rail Trail.

Easthampton received $200,000.00 to create a raised crossing for the Manhan Rail Trail over Payson Avenue as well as to install RRFBs, widen an existing sidewalk to provide a better connection to the downtown, and construct ADA-compliant curb ramps at the entrances of the Public Safety Complex and City Hall.

Edgartown, in partnership with the Martha’s Vineyard Transit Authority, received $200,000.00 to construct a 450-foot pedestrian path adjacent to bicycle parking that abuts the Church Street bus stop and install bicycle signage to improve traffic flow.

Essex received $160,743.00 to purchase and install ‘dark sky friendly’ pedestrian light fixtures along the downtown core of Main Street in order to create a safe and appealing streetscape.

Everett received $75,000.00 to install crossing improvements including ADA-compliant curb ramps and a new crosswalk at the intersection of Spalding and Main Streets, as well as wayfinding signage and temporary speed bumps at locations around the city.

Falmouth received $84,008.20 to create a10-foot-wide buffered bike lane on Curley Boulevard, to reduce the width of existing travel lanes from the old Main Street intersection west to an existing crosswalk on Quaker Road and install an RRFB at the existing Old Main Road crosswalk.

Fitchburg received $199,646.64 to improve the sidewalks from Oak Hill Road to Reingold Elementary School to complement previous Safe Routes to School projects.

Framingham received $199,907.60 to realign the existing intersection of School and Hamilton Streets, as well as install ADA-compliant curb ramps, reduced curb radii, shorten pedestrian crossings, and a new pedestrian island.

The Franklin Regional Transit Authority, in partnership with Montague, received $178,376.00, to improve FRTA bus stops on Millers Falls Road at Industrial Boulevard in Montague with shelters, bicycle racks, new crosswalks, and ADA-compliant curb ramps.

Freetown received $61,076.00 to create a well-lit crosswalk from the Freetown Elementary School to the Central Park ballfields with ADA-compliant curb ramps, as well as signage to increase the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists during games and town events.

Granville received $89,000.00 to purchase and install high-reflectivity speed limit and warning signs, delineators, and rumble strips on sections of roads with known safety problems.

Great Barrington, in partnership with the Berkshire Regional Transit Authority, received $62,500.00, to upgrade bus stops with signage, more accessible curbs, new bus shelters, solar-powered lighting, and benches.

Hatfield received $56,641.52 to install eight solar-powered button-activated flashing crosswalk signals along two main arteries in town and to extend a sidewalk at the Campawonk elderly housing complex.

Haverhill, in partnership with the Merrimac Valley Regional Transit Authority, received $50,000.00 to add new bus shelters with benches, WiFi hotspots and video screens to bus stops in Haverhill that serve public housing.

Holden received $106,514.63 to construct new sidewalks and ADA-compliant curb ramps to provide a safer route to Mountview Middle School.

Holliston received $194,200.00 to replace a sidewalk and install crosswalks, ADA-compliant curb ramps, electrical vehicle charging equipment, and park amenities such as a kiosk, bench, and bike rack as part of the 9 Green Street redevelopment project.

Holyoke received $200,000.00 to install raised crosswalks along with RRFBs at three locations that are heavily used by children and seniors and where vehicles travel at high speeds.

Leominster received $200,000.00 to create additional safe space for walking, biking, and downtown event activities by widening sidewalks, narrowing travel lanes, improving pedestrian crossings, and installing bicycle parking.

Lynn received $193,545.00 to install a curb extension, an RRFB, and new cement sidewalks to reduce vehicle speeds and prioritize pedestrians on Pleasant Street.

Malden received $84,799.00 to install two new flashing school-zone signs at the Beebe School and five new flashing school-zone signs at the Ferryway School.

Mashpee received $56,000.00 to install speed feedback signs on South Sandwich Road and Orchard Road.

Medfield received $145,411.67 to implement painted curb extensions along Main Street and install a new crosswalk with ADA-compliant curb ramps and RRFBs at the Melrose School.

Medford received $200,000.00 to implement traffic calming treatments including speed tables, speed feedback signs, and RRFBs along 10 corridors in the city, in addition to narrowing existing vehicle lanes to create on-street bike lanes on three streets.

Melrose received $77,900.00 to implement intersection improvements at West Emerson and Vinton Streets with a focus on pedestrian improvements, including changes to curb locations, a new center island, new ADA-compliant curb ramps, and the relocating and striping of crosswalks.

Methuen, in partnership with the Merrimac Valley Regional Transit Authority, received $392,659.71 to install new bus stops with shelters, crosswalks, pedestrian signage and wayfinding, curb extensions, and benches, along a 0.6-mile stretch of Lower Broadway.

Merrimac Valley Regional Transit Authority, in partnership with Lawrence and Amesbury, received $399,312.36 to install eighteen bus shelters with wayfinding signage, network maps and schedules, lighting, heating fixtures, and benches in Lawrence and Amesbury.

Millbury received $199,067.00 to improve safety, comfort, and connectivity for people bicycling and walking between the Blackstone River Bike Path trailhead and downtown Millbury Center with new sidewalks, RRFBs, pavement markings, wayfinding signage, ADA-compliant curb ramps, and a bike repair station.

Montachusett Regional Transit Authority, in partnership with Athol, Fitchburg and Gardner, received 180,000.00 to install twelve new bus shelters with solar-powered lighting.

Newbury received $200,000.00 to construct 400 linear feet of a fully accessible, paved, shared-use path along Parker Street to connect to the Clipper City Rail Trail and the regional Coastal Trails Network.

Newburyport received $123,779.00 to install a traffic calming island in the center of High Street from Cutting Drive to Myrtle Street.

Newton received $198,605.00 to improve safety for bicyclists, pedestrians, and school buses operating on Albemarle Road and Brookside Avenue through the installation of speed humps, painted bike lanes with flex-posts, curb extensions, removal of parking spaces, and a pedestrian island and bike markings.

North Brookfield received $200,000.00 to install new sidewalks and widen existing sidewalks, and install decorative lighting, benches, and ADA-compliant curb ramps along North Main Street.

Norwell received $200,000.00 to construct 0.5 miles of sidewalk to complete a three-mile pedestrian corridor on Main Street that connects to the Town Center, schools, athletic fields, and residential areas.

Orleans received $12,500.00 to install a speed table, as well as additional markings and signs, to reduce speeds and improve safety for bicyclists and pedestrians along the road approaching Skaket Beach.

Oxford received $198,000.00 to construct 1,000 feet of sidewalk along Church Street, from Main Street to Treasure Land Park and Playground, as well as to reduce intersection radii, narrow travel lanes, and enhance existing crosswalks.

Pepperell received $200,000.00 to install RRFBs with LED signs at the Nashua River Rail Trail crossing at Groton Street, as well as to expand the existing sidewalk along Main Street to make space for benches, planters, outdoor dining, and wayfinding signage to improve bicycle and pedestrian safety in the historic Railroad Square.

Pioneer Valley Transit Authority received $490,394.00 to improve bus stops including sidewalks, ADA-compliant ramps, crosswalks, pavement markings, signage, shelters, benches, and other amenities at fifteen locations in Amherst, Agawam, Chicopee, Palmer, Northampton, Springfield, and West Springfield.

Plainville received $44,800.00 to install solar-powered RRFBs at two existing crosswalks at elementary schools on Route 106.

Plymouth received $197,261.54 to reduce vehicular speeds and improve pedestrian safety through expanded curbs, RRFBs, improved signage visibility, and realigned and shortened crosswalks at two densely populated locations near schools.

Provincetown received $11,975.00 to install bicycle racks and a bicycle repair station at Cannery Wharf Park.

Quincy received $366,000.00 to expand transit signal priority to the Washington Street corridor for use by the MBTA Routes 220/222, as well as fill pedestrian infrastructure in gaps on Hancock Street and Quincy Avenue.

Randolph received $128,113.15 to install crosswalks, ADA-compliant curb ramps, curb extensions, a sidewalk, and an RRFB on Reed Street directly in front of the Donovan Elementary School as well as install speed tables at several locations in town.

Raynham received $38,650.00 to narrow North Main Street/Route 104 to accommodate 5-foot bike lanes and restripe crosswalks, as well as install signage and construct ADA-compliant curb ramps at major intersections.

Salem received $95,835.55 to install protected bicycle lanes, traffic calming elements such as chicanes and lane narrowing, a new crosswalk, and to improve access to a bus stop on North Street between Highland and Franklin Street.

Sharon received $73,340.00 to install the town’s first bikeshare system, with one location at the MBTA Commuter Rail station and another at the community center/senior center.

Springfield received $187,659.10 to implement mid-block crosswalks, pedestrian safety signs, RRFBs, ADA-compliant curb ramps, and pavement markings at PVTA and school bus stops on Dickinson and Allen Streets, as well as install a ValleyBike station at a municipal park in the Indian Orchard neighborhood.

Stockbridge received $132,994.95 to install raised and improved crosswalks and ADA-compliant curb ramps.

Taunton received $99,000.00 to improve crosswalks on Main Street by adding push-button RRFBs, high-visibility pavement markings, and in-street portable pedestrian crossing signs to be placed in the middle of crosswalks.

Tyngsborough received $134,722.50 to realign a roadway to improve the safety of an intersection, to install an ADA-accessible walkway to connect a residential neighborhood with the Town beach, commercial district, and bus routes, and to install a bus shelter and bike rack to serve the Lowell Regional Transit Authority Route 10.

Wakefield received $115,303.00 to implement sidewalk replacements and additions, ADA-compliant curb ramps, curb extensions, intersection realignment, restriped crosswalks, and RRFBs to improve pedestrian safety and connect neighborhoods to local businesses.

West Brookfield received $149,640.00 to implement safety and accessibility improvements at the crosswalk at the West Brookfield Elementary School.

Westfield received $177,888.00 to install its first ValleyBike bikeshare stations at Westfield University and at the Pioneer Valley Transit Authority Olver Transit Center, as well as to install wayfinding to help direct riders from the downtown to the Columbia Greenway Rail Trail.

Westwood received $20,000.00 to install four speed feedback signs, two along Pond Street and two along Clapboardtree Street.

Winchester received $87,480.25 to construct curb extensions to help manage speeds at the Wildwood Street curve, proximate to the Lynch School.

Winthrop received $53,568.00 to install eight solar-powered speed feedback signs along a stretch of Route 145 experiencing high vehicular traffic.

Worcester received $200,000.00 to install surface-mounted LED lights for three bridge underpasses located at Green Street, Franklin Street, and Madison Street to create a safe, walkable connection between the Downtown and Canal District that will also serve as a public art installation.

The following cities and towns were awarded grants for the purchase of equipment in this funding round:

Adams received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Alford received $33,462.86 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Amesbury received $19,729.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Arlington received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Ashburnham received $9,799.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Ashby received $14,640.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Ashfield received $10,541.90 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Attleboro received $35,012.64 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Avon received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Barnstable received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Bedford received $49,999.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities and speed feedback/messaging signs.

Belchertown received $47,850.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices and crossing signals.

Belmont received $19,474.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Braintree received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicyclist facilities.

Brockton received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Brookline received $49,920.00 for bicycle-lane delineators, pedestrian-activated warning devices, and other pedestrian improvements, as well as $16,726.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Canton received $8,935.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Charlemont received $44,332.96 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities and speed feedback/messaging signs.

Chesterfield received $45,458.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Cohasset received $9,674.99 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Cummington received $19,729.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Dedham received $25,000.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices and crossing signals.

Dracut received $26,000.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices and crossing signals.

Easthampton received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Essex received $43,848.87 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Fall River received $49,900.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices/crossing signals and $46,500.00 for traffic signals.

Fitchburg received $47,000.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Foxborough received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities and $25,000.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices/crossing signals.

Framingham received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Freetown received $43,054.86 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities and speed feedback/messaging signs.

Goshen received $45,558.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Grafton received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Greenfield received $31,229.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Harvard received $22,191.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Haverhill received $47,467.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Hingham received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Leominster received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Littleton received $22,728.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Longmeadow received $19,576.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices and crossing signals.

Lowell received $50,000.00 for traffic calming equipment including chicanes and speed humps.

Lunenburg received $6,708.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Malden received $42,050.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Manchester-by-the-Sea received $49,650.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Mashpee received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Medford received $50,00.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities, bicycle lane delineators, and a speed feedback sign and $49,500.00 for a pavement-marking machine and paint.

Melrose received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities and $30,943.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Merrimac received $41,952.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Middleton received $3,080.00 for pedestrian safety signage and pavement marking paint.

Millbury received $30,905.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Millis received $49,999.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Natick received $39,999.10 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Needham received two grants for $45,244.50 and $34,966.14 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

New Bedford received $50,000.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices and crossing signals.

Newburyport received $21,505.00 for pedestrian safety improvements including paint and curb extensions.

Newton received $48,000.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices and crossing signals.

Norfolk received $15,335.19 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

North Adams received $32,659.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

North Attleborough received $37,825.00 for messaging signs.

Northampton received $24,132.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities, a line painter for bicycle and pedestrian facilities, and a bicycle shelter.

Northfield received $40,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Norton received $41,800.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Otis received $46,417.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Paxton received $19,729.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Plymouth received $48,500.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs and $28,000.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices/crossing signals.

Princeton received $48,221.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Quincy received $50,000.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices/crossing signals and $49,500.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Raynham received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Reading received $47,535.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Rochester received $50,000.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Rockland received $23,883.50 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities and pedestrian safety improvements.

Rockport received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Salem received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Salisbury received $23,072.50 for pedestrian safety improvements and $3,025.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Sandwich received $19,474.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Scituate received $46,686.95 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Sheffield received $32,802.34 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities as well as bicycle racks.

Shelburne received $20,432.35 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Shrewsbury received $6,770.00 for messaging signs.

South Hadley received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Southbridge received $49,544.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Springfield received $50,000.00 for bikeshare station equipment.

Stoneham received $49,463.10 for pedestrian-activated crossing signals as well as other pedestrian safety improvements.

Swansea received $32,063.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Taunton received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Tewksbury received $23,548.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Uxbridge received $30,000.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Ware received $45,075.20 for pedestrian safety improvements.

Watertown received $50,000.00 for pedestrian and bicycle wayfinding signage.

Wellesley received $45,083.94 for pedestrian-activated warning devices and crossing signals.

Westborough received $32,490.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities and $30,792.00 for pedestrian safety elements.

Westfield received $41,800.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices/crossing signals.

Westhampton received $19,474.00 for speed feedback/messaging signs.

Whately received $10,608.75 for bicycle maintenance stations.

Williamsburg received $32,400.00 for pedestrian-activated warning devices/ crossing signals.

Winchester received $50,000.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Yarmouth received $49,420.00 for snow removal equipment for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

The Shared Streets and Spaces program provides grants as small as $5,000 and as large as $500,000 for municipalities and transit authorities to make changes to their streets that allow for safer walking, biking, public transit, recreation, commerce, and civic activities. These improvements can be intentionally temporary or permanent. MassDOT is particularly focused on projects that reduce vehicular speeds and provide safe mobility for children, for seniors, to public transportation, housing, and to open space and parks.

Prior to this funding round, a total of $33 million dollars in grant funding had been provided to Massachusetts cities and towns to facilitate 310 projects since program start in June of 2020.

Information about the Shared Streets and Spaces Program can be found online at https://www.mass.gov/shared-streets-and-spaces-grant-program

 

Baker-Polito Administration Announces $5.54 Million in Complete Streets Funding Program Awards

The Baker-Polito Administration today announced $5.54 million has been awarded to 16 communities as part of the Fiscal Year 2023 Round 1 of grants for the Complete Streets Funding Program. These grant awards will be used by recipient municipalities to fund local multimodal infrastructure projects that improve travel for bicyclists, pedestrians, public transit users, and people using other forms of transportation. This is the thirteenth overall grant round for this program since the Administration launched the program in 2016.

A “Complete Street” is one that enables safe, convenient, and comfortable travel for users of all ages and abilities regardless of their mode of transportation. Administered by MassDOT, the Complete Streets Funding Program aims to teach communities about Complete Streets and encourage the integration of Complete Streets into regular local planning practices. Since the launch of the Complete Streets Funding Program in 2016, 252 municipalities have worked through the program to adopt a local Complete Streets policy and 222 have advanced even further to develop an approved Complete Streets Prioritization Plan. A representative from each municipality registered with the program also attends a training course to learn about Complete Streets.

“The Complete Streets Funding Program has now awarded over $83 million in total funding through 444 technical assistance and construction awards since 2016 to support municipalities in their ongoing efforts to improve their transportation infrastructure, build safe, convenient and easily accessible transportation networks and to facilitate economic development opportunities,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “This program continues to advance mobility and connectivity throughout the Commonwealth.”

“Complete Streets are for everyone and provide important opportunities for communities to achieve their unique needs and goals,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “Programs like this support safe connectivity and increased economic activity throughout local neighborhoods and we look forward to seeing this progress in the future.”

“MassDOT is pleased to continue to work with municipal leaders to encourage the installation of infrastructure to help make for ‘Complete Streets’ everywhere,” said Transportation Secretary and CEO Jamey Tesler. “We want everyone in every city and town in the Commonwealth to have sidewalks, crosswalks, and other features which make it easy and safe to get to where they want to go.”

Today’s announcement regarding the Complete Streets Funding Program provides funding to the following communities:

Easthampton received $286,000.00 to improve crossing connections along Holyoke Street. Intersections will be upgraded to include ADA compliant curb ramps, rectangular rapid flashing beacons, and high visibility pavement markings. Sidewalks will also be replaced or added along the north side of East Green Street and the south side of Allen Street.

Franklin received $89,700.00 to install rectangular rapid flashing beacons at the Southern New England Trunk Line Trail crossing and at the existing crosswalk on Lincoln Street, as well as add bicycle parking in several locations.

Gardner received $400,000.00 to install a multi-use path. The path will connect Gardner Veterans Arena along Crystal Lake to the existing National Grid Power Substation.

Georgetown received $395,618.00 to install/improve rectangular rapid flashing beacons, speed feedback signs, crosswalk stripping, and curb ramps along North Street.

Holbrook received $398,807.00 for pedestrian improvements, rectangular rapid flashing beacons, and street trees along North and South Franklin Streets.

Holliston received $399,693.85 to install and repair sidewalks, curb ramps, crosswalks, and rectangular rapid flashing beacons on Central Street, as well as install bicycle parking at Holliston Grill and place speed feedback signs on Woodland Street and Norfolk Street.

Kingston received $399,599.00 to implement pedestrian improvements at the intersection of Route 106, Route 27, and Evergreen Street.

Lincoln received $268,865.00 for an extension of a shared use path to a community farm along Codman Road.

Milton received $277,577.70 for intersection improvements at the Brook Road, Central Avenue, and Reedsdale Road intersection near Route 28.

North Andover received $397,271.00 to reconstruct the intersection of Chadwick Street, High Street, and North Street.

Oxford received $224,000.00 to install sidewalks and ADA compliant ramps from Sigeorney Street to Freemont Street and reconstruct sidewalks on Main Street. Feedback signs will also be installed on Main Street and Sutton Avenue.

Pepperell received $400,000.00 to add sidewalks, crosswalks, rectangular rapid flashing beacons, and improve the overall geometry of the roundabout at Routes 111 and 113.

Raynham received $400,000.00 for a shared use path with accessible ramps, crosswalks, and rectangular rapid flashing beacons. The shared use path will provide pedestrian and bicycle access to the Raynham Senior Center, the Public Safety Building, and the Borden Colony Play fields.

Sandwich received $400,000.00 to resurface the intersection at Forestdale Road and Meetinghouse Road, to add bicycle lanes, reconstruct sidewalks, and add countdown crosswalk signals.

Taunton received $400,000.00 for improvements on Weir Street between First Street and Harrison Street. Improvements include the addition of painted bicycle lanes, road resurfacing, and reconstructed sidewalks.

Tewksbury received $400,000.00 to fill pedestrian network gaps between Fiske Street and Andover Street.

Approximately 60 percent of the total award dollars will fund projects located in environmental justice communities. Environmental justice communities are determined using U.S. Census data and are defined by the Commonwealth as communities in which the median household income is equal to or less than 65 percent of the statewide median, 25 percent or more of the residents identify as a race other than white, or 25 percent or more of households have no one over the age of 14 who speaks English only or very well.

Municipalities may apply for up to $400,000 in construction project funding in one application. Examples of project elements that can be implemented through the program include sidewalks, multimodal paths, bicycle lanes, improved street lighting, and pedestrian signalization at crosswalks or intersections.

For more information, visit the Complete Streets Funding Program website.

 

MassDOT’s Safe Routes to School Program Nationally Recognized for Safety Initiatives

The Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) is pleased to announce its Safe Routes to School Program (SRTS) has been nationally recognized in the annual state report cards issued by the National Safe Routes Partnership (NSRP).  Massachusetts is ranked number one, along with California, in the national “Making Strides 2022” report, which measures how supportive states are of walking, bicycling, rolling, and providing tools and resources to help keep children and community members active. The report cards are based on four key areas: Complete Streets and Active Transportation Policy and Planning; Federal and State Active Transportation Funding; Safe Routes to School Funding and Supportive Practices; and Active Neighborhoods and School.

“We are honored to be recognized as a state that is ‘building speed’ in our efforts to support and fund active transportation programs for our children and communities,” said Transportation Secretary and CEO, Jamey Tesler. “Under the leadership of Governor Charlie Baker and Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, we will continue to champion initiatives that encourage safe walking, biking, and rolling for the Commonwealth through Safe Routes to School, Complete Streets, Shared Streets and Spaces, and other MassDOT programs.”

The high scores in the key areas reflect MassDOT’s continued commitment to and prioritization of active and safe commutes for students across the Commonwealth. Specifically, Massachusetts received perfect scores for dedicating funding for active transportation and SRTS, providing special consideration for high-need communities, adopting goals to increase walking and bicycling, providing resources for SRTS initiatives, supporting equitable access to SRTS programming, and more.  Massachusetts, along with California, received the highest score nationwide. To access the complete report, visit: https://www.saferoutespartnership.org/resources/report/making-strides-2022-state-report-cards.

The Massachusetts SRTS Program, sponsored by MassDOT and with funds from the Federal Highway Administration, promotes safer routes for students to actively get to and from school by fostering partnerships between community-led organizations, local law enforcement, education leaders, and public health departments. The program currently serves more than 1,000 schools in over 255 communities across the Commonwealth. Through these partnerships, the Massachusetts SRTS Program highlights the importance of pedestrian and bicycle safety. The program also provides information, materials, and resources to support schools and communities with their local SRTS initiatives.

To access the Massachusetts SRTS dashboard of school partner activities across the state, visit: https://massdot.maps.arcgis.com/apps/dashboards/67b6b4eb55ad4c359ed67af1c2ebc6644.

To learn more about the Massachusetts Safe Routes to School Program visit: https://www.mass.gov/safe-routes-to-school.

Attendees
First Name Affiliation
Kylie MassDOT
Ian MassDOT
Mousumy MassDOT District 6
Cassandra MassDOT
Anni MassDOT
Noel MassDOT District 6
Lyris MassDOT
Corinna MassDOT
Neil MassDOT
Susan MBTA/MASSDOT
Richard MassDOT
Andrea MassDOT
Michael MassDOT
Maddie MassDOT
Alex MassDOT
Thomas MassDOT
Cheryl MassDOT
Thomas MassDOT District 3
Jenny MassDOT Highway Division
Michael MassDOT
Jonathan MassDOT
Michael MassDOT
Tiffany Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA)
Michael MassDOT District 6
Judith MassDOT District 1
David MassDOT
Christian MassDOT
Leah MassDOT
Abraham MassDOT
Jay Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority
Charlene Massachusetts Department of Transportation
Mary MassDOT
Owen MassDOT
Joseph Massachusetts Department of Transportation
Eamon MassDOT
Adam MassDOT
Christine MassDOT
Raissah MassDOT
Derek MassDOT
Ale MassDOT District 5
Alex MassDOT
Lou MassDOT District 5
Melissa MassDOT
Janhavi MassDOT
Kevin MassDOT
Francisco MassDOT Highway Design
William MassDOT
Chloe MassDOT
Olivia MassDOT Highway Division
Makaela MassDOT
Eitan MBTA
Corey MassDOT
Michael MassDOT
Adetoyin MassDOT District 5
Samuel MassDOT District 3
Hasmukh MassDOT
Irene MassDOT
Drew MassDOT
Kawtar MassDOT
Jose MassDOT District 4
Mustafa MassDOT
Matthew MassDOT
Thomas MassDOT
Nick MassDOT District 1
Owen MassDOT Aeronautics Division
Stephen MassDOT District 3
Kimberley MassDOT
James MassDOT
Gregory MassDOT
Stephen MassDOT
Gloria MassDOT District 4
Kayla MassDOT
Susan MassDOT
Frank MassDOT District 4
Sungchul MassDOT Highway Division
Shu MassDOT District 6
Hector MassDOT District 5
Michael MassDOT
Wystan MBTA
Amber MassDOT
Lorenzo MassDOT
Nicholas MassDOT
Courtney MassDOT
Andrew MassDOT
Zheng MassDOT
Andrew MassDOT
Steve MassDOT
Patrick MassDOT
Edward Alfred Benesch & Co.
Donald Private Citizen
Michael BL Companies (Corporate)
Michael BL Companies (Corporate)
Sarah Arborway Coalition
Bennett MassDOT - 10 Park Plaza
Nick BL Companies
John Meridian Associates
Mitchell TEC, Inc.
John HNTB Corporation
Charles BL Companies (Corporate)
Thomas BL Companies
Jonathan TEC, Inc. (MA)
Alexis Gill Engineering
Greg Walker Consultants
Frank Green International Affiliates
James Gill Engineering
Shahvir AI Engineers, Inc. (MA)
Adam Dewberry
Jeffrey City of Boston
Jeffrey Town of Yarmouth
Joseph City of Boston
Kelly City of Brockton Area Transit Authority (BAT)
Glenn Ann City of Brockton Area Transit Authority (BAT)
Shravanthi NMCOG
Joshua FHWA MA
Dave Town of Wellesley DPW
Allison City of Boston
Todd Town of Westwood
Michael City of Brockton Area Transit Authority (BAT)
Axel City of Boston
Jim City of Newton
Joseph City of Brockton Area Transit Authority (BAT)
Guilford Town of Amherst
Dan City of Easthampton
Greg City of Easthampton
Glen Town of Andover Police Department
Isaac City of Newton
Donna City of Brockton Area Transit Authority (BAT)
Kathy City of Brockton Area Transit Authority (BAT)
Cidalia City of Brockton Area Transit Authority (BAT)
Diane City of Easthampton
Griffin Town of Brewster
Linda City of Brockton Area Transit Authority (BAT)
Shawna City of Newton
David NMCOG
Aldo UMass Transportation Center (UMTC)